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7 Fundamental Components to a 7 Figure Practice: The Keys to Producing Results for Your Patients

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, May 13, 2020

office worker

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Every aesthetic practice strives to produce great results for patients and have long-term retention rates.

I wish I could tell you that I have magic fairy dust that can be sprinkled on your practice to guarantee success, or that there is one magic formula to magnetize patients and keep them coming back for more.

What I can do is share my roadmap, the “7 Fundamental Components to a 7 Figure Practice,” which will help you determine what you want to be known for and how to ensure you‘ll get there while providing a high-quality, positive patient experience. 

  1. Vision/mission—Who do you serve? What kind of patients do you want walking through your door? What is your ideal demographic? What are your core values as a practice? Do you have a mission statement? These are all questions to take into consideration so you can determine your ideal client and the level of customer service you provide.
  2. Branding/messaging—What does your brand represent? What image does your logo, website, collateral material and office project? Are you a comprehensive practice or do you specialize in a niche market? What is your unique value proposition (UVP)? What makes you stand out from your competition? Why would someone choose your providers or practice over another down the street?  Projecting the right image and being able to clearly communicate your UVP and credential both your practice and providers is critical to instilling patient confidence. Patients want to know they are choosing the right place to have their services, procedures and treatments performed.
  3. Systems—Choosing the right software systems and technology are key to long-term successful growth. Effective patient management software that enables you to measure key performance indicators is crucial to evaluate where your leads are coming from, your patient conversion rates, profit margins and a host of other important data. Do you have call tracking software in place to evaluate your phone conversion process? What consultation software tools might help boost your conversion rates?
  4. Services/treatments—Treatments and services offered fall into six general buckets: laser skin resurfacing, body contouring/fat reduction, skin tightening, injectables, aesthetician services and female/male rejuvenation, with a growing trend in integrative medicine. Taking a hard look at the financial data and choosing the most profitable treatments that yield the best patient results in each category can make a huge difference in the success of your practice.
  5. Marketing—Your number one marketing tool is your website. It is either working for you to generate hundreds of new leads each month, or it is ineffective. Your target marketing spend should be about 10% of your total revenue. Your website should be designed with search engine optimization in mind and written and developed by a company with experience in the aesthetic space.
  6. Team—Hiring the right team can make or break your practice. Your front desk staff, who answer the phone and greet patients when they arrive, are probably the most critical positions. They will make the first impression to a prospective patient. The experience they provide and the way they make the client feel will either turn them into a patient or turn them away.
  7. Training—I cannot emphasize enough the absolute necessity of training your staff. Whether you do it internally or invest in external sales and customer service, training is by far the biggest gap in the industry. The Practice Foundational Elements (PFE) System I teach focuses on training your team in the art of phone skills, converting web leads, consultations that convert (mastering communication, personality styles, handling objections and closing a sale), developing comprehensive treatment plans for patient retention and, perhaps the most overlooked of all, following up. 

If you would like more information, need recommendations for my vetted resources, or want to book or learn more about my onsite sales training, please click here.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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How to Effectively Lead Your Practice Through the COVID-19 Crisis

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, April 29, 2020

leader among followers

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

According to Gene Klann, author of the book Crisis Leadership, “During a crisis, a leader’s goal is to reduce loss and keep things operating as normal as possible.”

With the COVID-19 pandemic keeping your medical aesthetics practice’s doors shut right now, keeping things “operating as normal as possible” is not really a viable option. So how can you embrace and adapt to what is happening and lead your team effectively until your doors re-open?

Leadership is the anchor of great companies. It is the foundation of any business. Knowing your unique value proposition is more important than ever before, but does everyone on your team know that?

Here are six strategies that will help you be a powerful leader during a crisis.

1. Complete a SWOT Analysis

A SWOT analysis is an objective assessment.

  • Strengths: What you do well that makes you stand apart from the competition.
  • Weaknesses: What is not working and where you can improve.
  • Opportunities: Where can you pivot? How can you leverage your strengths and help to achieve the company goals?
  • Threats: What are the challenges that will influence or inspire us to take action?

2. Only Pass Along and Share Credible Information

With so much information floating around social media and coming from news sources with agendas, it can be tempting to pass along articles to your team that may be inaccurate or biased. Only pass along information that you have personally vetted and comes from reliable sources regarding the virus, your state’s plans for phasing in re-opening of businesses, etc.

3. Keep Lines of Communication Open

This is vital. Transparency and inclusiveness are key, especially in times of crisis. Regular, honest communication about the financial status of your practice, plans to re-open, job continuity or the possibilities of layoffs helps reduce emotional distress, reduce your team’s fear of the unknown and show your team that you are concerned, knowledgeable and monitoring the situation.

The best way to communicate is face-to-face through virtual meeting platforms, then follow up with written communication. I always tell my clients about reach and frequency when it comes to communicating with patients; reach and frequency with your staff is also vital. Don’t just share information once through one avenue—repeat information and reinforce it, as it helps with information retention.

When you don’t communicate clearly and consistently, people start to gossip and rumors start to fly. The truth is always better than twisted information, no matter how harsh it might be.

4. Be Proactive and Decisive

During times of crisis, you don’t have the normal luxury of time to begin addressing problems that come up; you have to buck up, step up and take charge. Make the hard decisions. Even if you might misstep or have to course-correct, being a leader means you need to take action. Nothing is worse for your anxiety level than being stuck in indecision. Remember that everyone is viewing the crisis through their own unique lens in terms of what is affecting them. A leader has to take the 20,000-foot view—considering the organization as the whole wheel, not just individual spokes—and make decisions based on that perspective.

5. Be Accessible to Your Team

Now more than ever before, it is important to let your team members know you are there for them. Make sure you let them know the best way to reach you and who to call if they have any questions. If you can maintain a sense of calm and stay in control, it keeps your team encouraged and gives them more confidence that you have a plan in place. Having an “open door” policy—or, at the very least, having a staff member designated as the “liaison”—goes a long way. This is also a great time to survey your team for feedback, making them feel important and that their opinions matter. Now is a great time to spark innovation. Perhaps someone has an idea for a promotion to run when you re-open, an event, how to improve current processes or some ideas to spotlight on social media or in a newsletter to patients. Welcome all suggestions, as your team may have more of a pulse on patient needs than even you do.

6. Dedicate the Downtime to Prepare for the Future and Level Up Your Practice

After the initial crisis period subsides, it’s time to start shifting gears, focusing on re-opening and figuring out what the “new normal” will look like. It is possible to come back bigger, better, stronger and wiser than before if you use the rest of this downtime wisely.

Here are some things you can be doing right now that I’ve compiled for you for easy reference:

  • Conduct a SWOT analysis.
  • Take an X-ray of your practice by completing a thorough practice assessment. Read more here.
  • Review all your financials and key performance indicators. Read more here.
  • Improve your sales training and learn how to conduct consultations that convert. Read more here. You can learn more about my online sales training course here.
  • Book yourself solid for when you anticipate re-opening. Reach out to your patients. Develop plans to expand hours when you re-open and how you can stagger patients and schedule your team. Read more here.

As always, tribe, my team is here to support you and is ready to help answer any questions you might have. Stay tuned for future blogs to prepare your practice for re-opening.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Listen to the InTouch with Terri Podcast

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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The Follow-up—The Cherry on Top of the Sales Process

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 4, 2020

follow-up phone call

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Imagine this scenario: You have a consultation with a prospective patient. It goes really well. You establish a good rapport. You answer all their questions and smoothly handle all their objections. However, when it comes to closing the deal and booking a procedure, they can’t quite commit at this time.

So, what do you do? If you are like most clinicians in the aesthetics industry, you chalk it up as a “win some, lose some” situation and move on to the next patient. But the truth is, not every prospect will say yes on the spot.

The Facts on Follow-up

Did you know that 80% of all sales require five follow-up touch points to close?  According to research by Marketing Donut:

  • 44% of sales reps stop following up after one rejection or ignored email;
  • 22% stop after two attempts;
  • 14% stop after three attempts; and
  • 12% stop after four attempts.

That means 8% of salespeople are scoring 80% of the deals.

So how does that translate or apply to generating revenue for your med spa? It means that establishing a prospective patient follow-up protocol and a process to nurture existing patients for additional sales is crucial. This is how repeat business and referrals are generated—through consistent follow-up.

Why Follow Up?

Following up does not mean being a pest or annoying people. If you shift your mindset from selling to educating, you simply are providing additional opportunities to educate them about what you offer and why they need it.

If you can detach or release the expectation for when the sale happens and instead focus on...

  • Cultivating the “know, like and trust” factor and genuinely communicating educational information with prospective patients;
  • Continuing to reach out to people who already know who you are or with whom you have established some relationship vs. spending more money on generating new leads through advertising;
  • Respecting that some people really do need time to think about a large financial outlay, but not letting too much time pass for them to linger on a decision; and
  • Putting a concrete, consistent follow-up plan into place,

...you can experience the magic of following up and watching your revenue increase.

Create a Post-Consultation Follow-up Plan

If a patient doesn’t book post-consultation, here is my six-step follow-up plan:

  1. Send a thank you email—or, better yet, a hand-written note that will really set you apart—and include follow-up information about the physician, practice or procedure they were interested in.
  2. Schedule a follow-up call two days post-visit (or whatever protocol your practice decides works best) to offer more information, see if they have had time to think about it or have any questions, and schedule an appointment if they are ready.
  3. Track all communication in your practice management software program.
  4. Continue to stay in touch when appropriate. Invite prospective patients to education events or seminars.
  5. Send monthly newsletters out to prospects, as well as to all established patients, as future touch points to highlight a particular procedure, treatment or special you might be running. Use these newsletters to credential your staff, educate on the latest trends or new equipment you might have, or a particular retail product that is a much smaller investment.
  6. Vary your message in email communication—include a provider video or a testimonial, or perhaps take the opportunity to simply thank them for their continued support and check in to see how they are doing.

If you need help with establishing a strong follow-up process or feel you or your staff could use expert sales training, I am here to help. To learn more or book your onsite sales training today, click here.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Terri Ross Consulting 

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Take an X-Ray of Your Practice

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 19, 2020

financial analysis

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

As a practice management consultant and sales performance coach in the aesthetic space, I speak all over the country. Some of the most common questions I receive from staff and medical providers time and time again are:

  • Why are we not growing as fast or generating as much revenue as we would like to?
  • Why aren’t our schedules full?
  • What reports should I run?
  • Why isn’t my website generating any leads?

These are very valid questions. In fact, I asked myself the very same questions years ago.

When I was hired by Lasky Aesthetics & Laser Center in Beverly Hills, California, back in 2012, I created a comprehensive process designed to analyze the entire business from the ground up. I made bold recommendations that resulted in an incredible turnaround and generated more than $600,000 of additional revenue in one year.

So, how did I do it? I realized that data doesn’t lie. It was factual, and I needed to take a good hard look at that data and figure out where the gaps existed. Then, I had to find the opportunities for growth. Most importantly, I had to take action and make the investment into the business.

Getting a Clear Picture

My clients consider my Practice Assessment to be the ultimate X-ray tool to uncover missing revenue and growth opportunities.

The Practice Assessment is a robust, 17-page tool (your homework) that asks comprehensive, probing questions and requires you to provide meticulous details about your business. I’ve been told it is an enlightening exercise. This assessment will help me to evaluate every area of your practice, including:

  • Revenue sources and goals;
  • Facility and overhead costs;
  • Services offered and profitability;
  • Equipment; 
  • Strengths and weaknesses analysis;
  • Patient retention; 
  • Lead generation sources and follow-up;
  • Consultations and conversion rates;
  • Operations;
  • Marketing;
  • Website and SEO;
  • Information technology; and
  • Human resources.

Once you complete the Practice Assessment, I will analyze your information and provide you with a high-level summary report of concrete action steps. You’ll get my expert recommendations based on years of experience that, if implemented, will turn your business around. (Click here to learn more). I highly recommend you investing the time and resources into completing this detail-oriented assessment to achieve concrete results.

Nevertheless, I wanted to give you an overview of how to get started gathering your own information to evaluate.

Gather Necessary Information

Before you can accurately find the gaps in your practice and identify areas to improve, you must have data to analyze. Money is an important factor, and knowing your financial facts and bottom line is critical to future growth.

Gather what you can from your patient management software, your profit and loss statements, and any and all sales- and marketing-related information you have access to, and…

Let’s Get Started

Here are some sample questions from the Practice Assessment to get you started.

  • What is your previous year’s revenue? Your current revenue? Your retail revenue? Your current goals?
  • What treatments are your most profitable? How much revenue does each treatment generate?

Does anything jump out at you so far?

  • What services do you offer (surgical and nonsurgical)? How many appointments have you booked for each type this month, quarter or year?
  • What is your consultation conversion ratio?

Now let’s think about leads coming in.

  • How many leads does your website generate per month, if any?
  • Do you have a process in place for following up on leads?
  • What percentage of leads convert to consultations?

Let’s move on to marketing.

  • What kind of marketing are you doing, and are you measuring results?
  • How often do you communicate with your patients?

Let’s talk technology.

  • What kind of patient management software are you using?
  • What kinds of KPIs do you measure?

Consider your staff.

  • How many staff members do you currently employ?
  • Have they been trained in sales, consultations and customer service? If not, how do you know if they are doing a good job?

Interpreting Practice X-Ray Results

Based on the breakdown of your revenue and expenditures, you might need to shift to higher-revenue-generating treatments, increase your pricing, and evaluate your staff and their skill sets. Hire more or reduce your staff, incorporate long-term treatment plans and increase your marketing spend.

You might need to revamp your website. Is it dynamic and producing hundreds of leads per month? You also may need to establish a better follow-up system for tracking leads. Additionally, you most likely need to invest in expert sales training for your staff so that you feel confident in their ability to do their job successfully.

Now that you know what types of questions to ask yourself and what information is needed for an accurate assessment, you might be feeling a bit overwhelmed.

I want to give back and help you like I’ve helped others. To reduce risk, invest in experts who will save you time and money, and avoid costly mistakes. I am here to support you. Please feel free to reach out if I can answer any questions.

Ready to Roll?

If you would like to get started bridging the gaps in your practice so you can improve the patient experience, convert more patients into paid services and generate more revenue, click here to get started with your practice assessment today.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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How to Hire and Recruit the Best Team for Your Aesthetic Practice

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 5, 2020

new hire

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

I see many aesthetic practices make the mistake of jumping too quickly into the hiring process without considering a few key pieces of information.

What You Should Know Before You Begin

Before you rush to advertise a job opening or hire additional staff, it is important to consider your long-term plan. Taking a bit of time up front to reflect on the following questions will be time well spent; this time just might end up saving you money, time on training and headache later on:

  • What is your mission and vision for the business, and what type of personality traits and skill set do you expect them to have to fit into your culture?
  • What is your vision for growing your practice in the next year?
  • How will this person contribute to the growth?
  • What level of training will you provide this new hire to ensure they meet the demands of the position and are an asset rather than an expense?
  • What specific qualities or qualifications and personality traits are needed for the role you are filling?

If you are replacing an existing staff member who only gives short notice prior to their departure, you might feel pressured and tempted to simply post an ad online and find a warm body to fill the position. However, finding quality people often takes time. I encourage you to take some time to think about and/or to speak with the rest of your team to determine some of the strengths and weaknesses of the previous employee and what skill set that position actually needs. Then, discuss what you are looking for in a replacement. Oftentimes, it is better to hold out than rush into hiring someone who is not a good long-term fit.

Some factors to consider include:

  • What responsibilities would you like the person in this role to take on?
  • Are clear expectations set forth and defined?
  • What personality traits match the position?
  • Was there too much responsibility or too large a workload placed on the previous employee, or were they simply not a good fit?
  • Is there someone internally who might be a better fit for this position or would like to move into this role?

After you are clear on exactly what you are looking for, the next step is making sure that you have a clear, concise, accurate job description. Now more than ever, it is imperative that you have thorough job descriptions to make sure you are compliant with your state labor and employment laws. Job descriptions should:

  • Outline specific salary and bonuses;
  • Detail the exact skills and experience necessary to perform the position’s duties;
  • Serve as a basis for recruiting and interviewing;
  • Give a clear scope of responsibilities and expectations;
  • Provide a baseline for employee reviews, salary increases and meeting expectations; and
  • Serve as legal documentation in the event an employee files a termination or discrimination suit against the company.

If you don’t have a job description created for each position in your office, I’ve got you covered. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. I offer a full bundle or individual job description downloadable templates for purchase on my website.

Streamlining the Process

There are several recruiting sites where you can post job ads, including AmSpa’s job board, Indeed, ZipRecruiter, LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Simply Hired and Monster. Some sites have free listings and others have fees for posting, so the ones you use might depend on your budget.

Terri’s tactics for streamlining the hiring process:

  • Be proactive. Always be searching for qualified candidates, even if it means hiring before a start date you had in mind.
  • Act quickly but carefully. If you find a qualified candidate you are excited about, don’t wait to extend the offer, but make sure you are not rushing.
  • Involve your team in the process and solicit feedback from them, as mentioned earlier. Buy-in and teamwork is essential.
  • Interview based on quality, not quantity. Pick out the top 10 resumes and conduct prescreening calls. Then, choose the top five to schedule in-person interviews. Narrow down your choices and schedule a second interview, and invite several members of your team to be involved. Including other team members can help to ensure the candidate fits your practice culture.
  • Consider administering a skills assessment test. Just because someone says they have skills doesn’t always mean they do. If it is a front desk position, run them through role-play caller scenarios to see how their customer service skills measure up. Some personality tests I recommend are Myers-Briggs, DISC and The Predictive Index.
  • Make sure to conduct a background check and employment verification check. According to CareerBuilder, up to 56% of candidates have false information on their resumes.

Terri’s top six interviewing tips:

  1. Always ask open-ended questions. Let the candidate tell you about their background so that you can hear how they communicate. (Example: “Tell me a bit about your background.”)
  2. Clarify information that you find interesting by asking them to elaborate. (Examples: “That’s really interesting, tell me more.” “How so? What made you come to that decision?”)
  3. Be curious. Try to learn more about what makes them tick and the “why” behind their interest in the position. (Examples: “What made you decide to apply for this position?” “What about the aesthetic industry excites you?”)
  4. Determine their research or motivation level. Ask questions to gauge whether or not they did their homework about your practice. Remember, you are looking for long-term candidates, not just anyone needing a job. (Examples: “What interests you about our practice?” “How much do you know about the services we offer or the clientele we serve?”)
  5. Ask them about their past experiences and how they were able to overcome challenges. This technique can give you a lot of information about the candidate and assess their problem-solving skills. (Example: “Tell me about a time you had a challenge at work or with a customer or client and how you handled the situation.”)
  6. Always end by asking the candidate if they have any questions for you. Putting the ball in the candidate’s court can often give you good information about their true motivations and level of interest.

The Next Step After Hiring Staff

Most practices do not have formal training in place, so even if you hire and find the best possible candidates, they may not be able to help move you towards your goals of expansion or generating more revenue.

Establishing a formal sales training program is a key, critical component to growing your aesthetic practice. 

While there is no substitute for comprehensive sales training, there are a few key components to provide every new employee:

  • An employee checklist with necessary paperwork and forms;
  • A job description; 
  • A comprehensive employee manual with policies and procedures;
  • Work hours and a holiday schedule, plus details on paid time off, personal time, etc.;
  • A workstation and the necessary equipment to perform their job functions; and
  • Training in whatever areas that are necessary.

Remember, I’m here to help. Please feel free to contact me with any questions at terri@terriross.com. You can purchase your full set of job descriptions here.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Terri Ross Consulting 

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Credentialing and Creating Your Unique Value Proposition

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, January 22, 2020

medical spa team

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Prospective patients are buyers who want to know the answer to several questions. What’s in it for me? How do your products or services solve or improve my situation? What specific benefits do you deliver or offer? Why should I choose your practice or provider over another? What differentiates you from the competition?

They want emotional reassurance that they are making the right decision to choose you. They typically have some apprehension that something could go wrong, or questions about how good you are or how much experience you have performing the procedure they want.

Creating a clear, consistent message around your unique value proposition and explaining your credentials can take the guesswork out of promoting your practice and get your entire team on the same page and delivering the same message, further enhancing your brand.

The Importance of Credentialing

In a competitive and commoditized marketplace, credentialing is your time to shine. It is your opportunity to display your knowledge, education and expertise, and why patients should trust you and choose you.

Ideally, this should be apparent on your website. The message should be consistent for your staff answering the phones. They should be able to:

  • Explain the various services and products you offer;
  • Communicate how many years you have been in business, introduce the various providers on your team and describe their level of experience in aesthetics;
  • Confidently explain what makes your practice stand out and unique; and
  • Tell prospective clients what they can expect when they come to your practice—patients buy experiences, not products or services.

Why Credentialing is Often Overlooked

Sometimes my clients feel awkward credentialing because, in some respects, they feel like they are bragging or they don’t want to talk about themselves. Or, they feel like they are too busy to make time for that conversation.

One of the challenges I hear the most consistently when I am conducting sales trainings is, “Terri, we want to do this, but we don’t know what to say. We need a script to follow so we can have a consistent message.”

That’s why I created a step-by-step formula for you to create your own unique value proposition and an exact credentialing script you can tailor to your practice.

Credentialing and Creating your Unique Value Proposition is a tool designed to help market your practice, and you can download it here instantly for only $47.

The Two P’s of Credentialing

There are two aspects of credentialing—credentialing your provider and your practice.

Your team should be able to answer the following questions when communicating information to prospective patients about your provider:

  • Who will be performing the consultations and treatments? Will it be an MD, NP, PA or RN?
  • How many years of experience do they have?
  • How many years in aesthetics?
  • Have they received any special training—PDO, threads, lasers, butt lift, etc.?
  • What range of procedures does the provider perform or specialize in?
  • Are they known as a trainer or educator?
  • Are they recognized by any manufacturer for their volume?
  • Have they been published, or are they a speaker on this procedure?

Your team should be able to answer the following questions when communicating information to prospective patients about your practice:

  • How many years has the practice been in business?
  • How many providers do you have?
  • What is the practice’s specialty or specialties?
  • Is there anything different or special about the practice’s location or environment?
  • Is the practice recognized by any manufacturer for its volume (Diamond, Platinum Plus, etc.)?

By knowing the credentials behind your providers and practice, you are forming the basis for your unique value proposition.

As always, I’m here to help you identify opportunities for growth and put the pieces in place that result in increased revenue, long-term patient retention and a more confident team.

Take the first step today by downloading Credentialing and Creating your Unique Value Proposition here. If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at terri@terriross.com or call me at (310) 272-5715.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Terri Ross Consulting 

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4 Critical Elements for Converting Web Leads into Consultations

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, January 8, 2020

receptionist

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

I’d like you to think about a few important questions:

  • What percentage of your leads are coming from your website?
  • Do you track these leads?
  • How quickly do you respond to inquiries?
  • Do you have a clear, concise process for follow-up?
  • Do you have a dedicated person on staff to handle this?

If you answered “I don’t know” or “no” to any of these, don’t worry—I’m here to help you create a game plan to more effectively convert your web leads into new business.

Did you know that the average aesthetics practice generates 52% of its leads from its website? That is larger than patient referrals, social media, other physicians, referral sites and traditional marketing combined. If you don’t have a carefully thought-out plan, process and practice in place to track and convert these leads, you are leaving money on the table.

Website leads are generally “cold” leads, which means the prospect typically:

  • Is highly cost-conscious;
  • Was not referred by anyone;
  • Found you with an online search; and/or
  • Has some anxiety about results, downtime, pain, recovery, anesthesia, etc.

It is challenging to convert cold leads, as you must be able to quickly respond and clearly communicate your practice’s unique value proposition (UVP).

1. Timing

Web leads are seven times more likely to convert to sales if you respond to them within an hour of contact. If they are looking at your practice online, no doubt they are contacting others as well.

If there is someone within your practice who is able to monitor web leads in real time when they come in (whether it is your front desk administrator, patient care coordinator or office manager), that is the optimal way to ensure you have high conversion rates.

All leads should be entered into your patient management software, and the prospect should be contacted within an hour via:

  1. A call;
  2. An email; and then
  3. A text message.

(Note: Do not leave a detailed message on an answering machine regarding what the prospect called about, as that can be sensitive information.)

If you are unable to reach the prospect, follow up again in 48 hours with a phone call, then an email and then a text. Finally, seven days later, make a final attempt to follow up with a call, then an email and then a text. After that point, you can simply keep their information for your mailing list for upcoming newsletters or promotions.

2. Information Gathering

I cannot stress the importance of information gathering highly enough. Taking the time to input the following information into your software can be the difference between an average follow-up call and one that converts a lead into a paid consultation:

  • Date of initial inquiry;
  • Referral source;
  • Patient demographics;
  • Areas of interest or concerns;
  • Interest level if indicated (immediate, moderate or just gathering information);
  • Date of first patient contact; and
  • Follow-up data.

3. Automated Email

If it is not possible to have a designated staff member monitoring your incoming web inquiries in real time, someone on your staff should be checking on these leads several times a day.

It’s very important to have an automated response email that generates when someone submits a web inquiry. This email should be both friendly and informative, welcoming them to your practice and assuring them that someone will follow up with them within 24 hours.

4. Follow-up Email Etiquette

If a prospect is unable to be reached by phone, the next step is to send a personalized follow-up email. Here are my best practices for follow-up email etiquette:

  • Personalize each email by using address headers with a specific name field rather than keeping it general. This adds a personal touch.
  • Use business etiquette. Be professional and not too casual in both the greeting and the closing. Ensure proper grammar and spelling.
  • Ensure privacy by using a general subject line like “An important message from Dr. XYZ.” Use a “hook” that gives them a reason to open the email.
  • Introduce yourself. Tell the prospect who you are, what you do and what your UVP is. Give your credentials, the details of your staff and what makes your practice stand out from others.
  • Answer the specific question that addresses the prospective patient’s inquiry or provide additional resources. Link to a specific page on your website, procedure information, a brochure or a video about your practice.
  • Remember to include a privacy notice at the bottom of the email.
  • Have a strong call to action asking your patient to schedule a consultation or appointment, along with your hours, phone number and fees.

Remember, I’m here to help you make your practice thrive. If you would like to schedule a call to see how I can train your team to generate more revenue for your practice, please click here.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Terri Ross Consulting 

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The Secret Weapon That Will Explode Your Medical Spa Sales

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 18, 2019

medical spa receptionist

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

As a leading sales training expert in the aesthetic industry with vast experience as a medical device sales director managing successful, peak performance teams and generating upwards of $20 million in revenue, one of the questions I get asked most frequently when I conduct staff trainings and seminars across the country is, “Terri, what is the number one thing we can do to increase our practice’s revenue?”

Can you guess what it is? Increasing pricing? Cramming in more patients per day? Shortening your consultation allotted time? Selling more expensive product lines or adding more retail products? Hiring more staff?

Those are usually the guesses I hear when I’m out speaking on expert panels at industry events or conducting onsite sales training in cosmetic surgery practices and medical spas around the country.

However, investing in powerful sales training for your team is the most overlooked strategy to increase your practice’s revenue, conversion rates and retention rates—whether you are in the process of launching your practice or are wanting to scale your current practice.

Understanding the Patient Journey

Sales and customer service are at the core of any successful business. The aesthetics patient is smart, savvy, educated and has a lot of choices when choosing one practice over another. Having a well-trained, knowledgeable and professional team is the difference between “good” and “great.”

It is critical to understand the importance of the patient journey and how each phase represents a distinct opportunity to provide high-quality patient care and ensure a positive, memorable customer service experience.

Approximately 52% of patient leads come from finding your website online, 25% are referrals from other patients, and the other 25% come from social media, other referring sites, other physicians or paid advertising.

A patient’s first point of contact with your practice is the initial phone call. This is your first and probably most important opportunity to make a great first impression.

Here are some questions to consider when evaluating how your staff is answering phone calls:

  • What kind of tone and attitude are they conveying with their voices?
  • Are they knowledgeable? Can they answer all of a prospective patient’s questions?
  • How well-trained are your team members on all procedures you perform and the products you use?
  • Can your staff easily explain why your practice stands out from the competition? In other words, can they answer “Why choose us?”
  • How solution-focused is your staff and how well-versed are they on the outcomes and benefits of each procedure?
  • Can your staff confidently navigate questions regarding pricing and potential objections?
  • Can they engage in dialogue to ask questions, rather than simply answering with a yes or no?
  • Are they making sure all of the prospects’ questions are answered?
  • Are they engaging in active/intuitive listening—hearing potential concerns behind the surface question?
  • Are they offering to schedule a consultation appointment to every caller?
  • What is their conversion rate for turning phone leads into consultation appointments?

I’ve created a free e-book resource that specifically focuses on this subject. Click here to download your free copy of The 13 Critical Components of a Successful Phone Call. As always, feel free to reach out if you have any questions or would like to set up a strategy session with me on this critical aspect of the art of sales.

Scheduling a Consultation

The goal of each patient inquiry should end with a call to action. Potential clients want to know the next step to take, even if they don’t verbalize that. Your team should always offer a clear path and call to action to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

The initial phone call is critical to book a consultation, which is an opportunity to convert a patient to a paying procedure.

Here are some questions for evaluating your staff’s ability to capture all the relevant information needed:

  • Are they gathering complete patient information, including name, referral source, best contact information, email, phone number, procedures they are interested in, address, zip code, date of birth, gender, concerns or any specific notes?
  • Are they following up with appointment reminders via text and phone calls?
  • Do they explain your cancellation policy and fee?
  • Are they taking credit card information to keep on file to reduce no-show rates?

If you are like most physicians, you are so busy working in your practice and using your gifts to perform highly skilled procedures that you may often overlook the critical component of working on your practice and training your front office sales team.

That is why it is vital to give your own practice a checkup. Scheduling one to three more patients a day for consultations could translate into $50,000 to $100,000 more a month.

Isn’t that worth the investment in sales training?

Even if your practice has not launched yet, now is the time to invest in expert sales training to start out on the right track.

Your front office team can easily be trained to be your most efficient, revenue-generating sales force, and as a clinical provider, your consultations can improve drastically for a better patient experience.

Remember, I’m here to help you make your practice thrive. If you would like to schedule a call to see how expert sales training can generate more revenue for your practice, please fill out this discovery questionnaire, and I will be happy to connect with you.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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How to Build Your Retail Program

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 4, 2019

retail products

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Incorporating retail products into your medical aesthetic practice can substantially strengthen your sales program, increase patient satisfaction, boost profitability and increase patient retention—all things that are vital to positive patient outcomes and a healthy practice.

The key to a successful retail program is focusing on products that compliment your treatments and services. Don’t try to be a one-stop-shop—carefully define which products will augment laser skin resurfacing, body contouring or skin tightening; research the options; have the reps come in and do an in-service; and ask to evaluate the products in addition to understanding the numbers and the support the company offers.

Once you’ve selected your vendors and the lines you want to carry (my recommendation is to choose no more than 3-4 SKUs), spend the time and resources necessary to train your staff and integrate the products into your personalized treatment plans and services. ABE—always be educating; if you’re not, or your team is not, stats show your patients will go to a department store or drugstore and buy products, and this obviously does not add value to your practice. After you’ve launched your retail program, follow up on the numbers and make adjustments as necessary to fine-tune and maximize your profitability.

Define Your Niche

Defining your niche is the most important step in building a successful retail program. Just as you seek to define your niche in the world of medical aesthetics through specialized treatments and services, you should seek to define your niche in the products you offer. They should be carefully tailored to your treatment plans. Don’t try to offer every product on the market—this will overwhelm your patients and will negatively impact your retail profitability. Why? Because patients will feel less like they are being offered a product to enhance their specialized treatment and more like they are being sold as many products as possible to increase their overall expenses. When you hone in on a specific retail line, you give patients the impression that you have carefully selected a product that will complement their services, leading to increased patient satisfaction and trust. Also, by focusing on a particular product line, you give your staff the opportunity to really learn the products, applications and relevant technology. Their ability to answer patient questions accurately and thoughtfully is critical and will further enhance the patient experience.

Research the Options

Conduct careful and thorough research of potential retail partners, their products and their current relationships with other offices. Once you’ve honed in on a specific type of product, take note of how many retailers offer that product and what types of products are typically offered in parallel. When choosing a vendor, prioritize product quality and partnership satisfaction. Product quality is crucial—the products you offer patients at your practice will reflect on the overall quality of your services, and your goal is to offer the best patient experience possible. Partnership satisfaction is equally as important. How easy is the vendor to work with? How frequently are they willing to deliver and replenish inventory? What are the potential markups on each product? Is there an opportunity to grow with the vendor and expand as demand increases? What educational support do they offer? Are there minimum quantities? Do they buy back? These are key details to know in advance of making any binding commitments with potential vendors. Read more about how to choose the right vendor in this article from Business.org. The vendor you choose should have a strong record of sales, customer reviews and partner relationships.

Evaluate the Numbers

Once you’ve identified a few vendors, you’ll want to dig deeper into the numbers. What types of products offer the highest profitability in the medical aesthetics market? What products offer patients the best outcomes, both in combination and stand-alone? What are the profit margins for some of the key products in each retail line you’ve targeted? What is a typical quarterly return on investment (ROI)? While some of these numbers are relatively straightforward to calculate, others may be more difficult to pinpoint and will require careful research.

A key part of your investigation should be based on patient satisfaction. After all, even if profitability on a product historically is high, you must first sell the product to make a profit. Research how well customers respond to specific products offered by each vendor and calculate an estimate of overall satisfaction. It also may be beneficial to reach out to other medical aesthetics practices that offer specific products and request a rough estimate of patient satisfaction. What percentage of patients who buy this product review it positively? Would they recommend it to a friend or colleague? How many times have they purchased the product over the last year? How many products does a patient purchase, on average? Some of these numbers may be provided by the vendor themselves, particularly if they are a more established entity. Though careful research takes time, it will be worth your investment to evaluate potential vendors by the numbers before making a commitment.

Manage Your Relationship with Vendors

Once you’ve identified the vendors you want to work with, your next step is to establish and maintain a healthy relationship with this business partner. First, make sure any contractual agreements signed are mutually beneficial. In most cases, they will be, because you have parallel goals—to satisfy patients and sell products. Because product prices can fluctuate with the market, you may want to request written confirmation that the price will not fluctuate more than a maximum allowable percentage, based on your evaluation of profitability. Maintaining transparency is the most important part of managing your relationship with vendors. Pass along feedback on their products from your patients, whether it be positive or negative. They may be able to expand a specific line or improve upon existing products to better satisfy patients in your office. The goal is to grow together. If your sales program is performing exceedingly well, they will be able to learn from you. If your sales have become stagnant, they may be able to offer tips on how to boost your marketing program and may even provide literature or product demonstrations to increase your success with the product. Seek to establish and maintain a positive, honest and mutually beneficial relationship with your vendor.

Integrate Products into Your Treatment Plans

Aside from product quality and vendor relations, how well you integrate product lines into your treatment plans and services is the most important part of a successful retail program. Create in-house literature to support the products you offer, such as pamphlets, posters and quarterly newsletters. Include the expert opinions of physicians, as well as positive feedback from patients who have already tried the products in your office. You want to give your patients the impression that these products will enhance their overall experience and the success of the treatments they receive. If a specific product has been shown to increase the effectiveness of a certain treatment or prolong the effects of a certain service, emphasize that in your marketing plan. In short, the product line you’ve chosen to sell should not stand alone in the back corner of your waiting area. Spotlight the products by featuring them in personalized treatment plans and monthly specials. A successfully integrated retail program will enhance the overall patient experience, resulting in increased patient satisfaction and increased profitability.

Train Your Staff

The success of your retail program is directly proportional to how well your staff is trained. As I discuss in my LAER model of staff training, it is critical that every member of your staff listens to and engages your patient population. They should be intimately familiar with the personalized treatment plans and services you offer. When you launch a retail program, invest in staff training. A well-trained staff will have a thorough understanding of your products, how they will be incorporated into your treatment plans and how they compare to similar products on the market. The goal is to inform your staff so they can inform your patients. When a patient asks about a specific product, they should receive a well-informed, positive response. This will not only help to increase trust in your staff, but also boost sales and lead to increased profitability.

Staff training is critical to almost every aspect of your medical aesthetic office. You invest in a beautiful office, you invest in expense equipment, and you invest in marketing to get new patients, but often internal training is overlooked or neglected. Training your team to convert calls into appointments, convert web leads and conduct an effective patient consultation require skills, confidence, knowledge and effective communication. Investing in training will yield the greatest ROI and build confidence for empowering your staff to help you grow your business and provide five-star customer service. To learn more about the processes and techniques that go into an effective sales program, contact me today and ask about my workshop on staff training.

Keep an Eye on the Numbers

Once you’ve built a retail program, you’ll want to review the numbers at least once per quarter. Calculate your overall ROI on retail sales and determine which products have the highest sales and profitability rates. Also, take note of which products patients purchase more than once. The most expensive products do not always offer the highest profit margins. Use this data to tailor your marketing program and staff training, if needed.

If a particular product isn’t selling well, execute a plan to incorporate it into a monthly special, or feature it in a specific service or treatment plan. Consider sending out a product survey in your quarterly newsletter to learn which products your current and prospective patients are most interested in; use this data to hone your inventory and boost sales. You also can report this data back to your vendors, so they can better plan and tailor their production and inventory delivery. If you want to sustain a successful retail program, you’ll need to keep a regular eye on the numbers and make the necessary adjustments in your protocols, processes, marketing and staff training.

Building and maintaining a successful retail program can substantially increase patient satisfaction and boost profitability. Have you maximized profitability in your office? Contact me to find out how you can implement a successful sales program in your office today.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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Launching a Medical Aesthetics Practice: Key Factors to Consider

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 20, 2019

medical spa staff

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Launching a medical aesthetics practice can be an incredibly challenging but ultimately rewarding venture. Before opening the doors to your practice, there are several key factors to consider, including, but not limited to, market characteristics, population statistics, competition, potential resources and personal drive.

Market

The status, pace and growth of your niche market is the most critical factor that will directly impact the success and profitability of your medical aesthetics practice. Take a pulse of what’s happening in your target area. Is the market already saturated? How many offices are currently in operation? How many have opened in the last five years? Are they expanding? What specialty treatments and services do they offer?

Identify practices that have demonstrated considerable success and learn from them. Take note of their infrastructure, marketing style, target clientele, etc. Your goal is to create a medical aesthetics practice that excels above the competition. There are a few ways to approach this goal. First, you can strive to meet the needs of your target clientele better than existing practices. This can be achieved by providing a superior patient experience: upscale office and treatment areas, knowledgeable and engaging staff, and personalized treatment plans. Conversely, you can strive to meet a new need in your target population by specializing in a new area or offering unique treatment plans. (Click here to read an article from Forbes about how to find and develop your niche market.). The key is to identify an area of the medical aesthetics market that is under-developed in your region of interest—and capitalize on it.

Population Statistics

Before launching your medical aesthetics practice, you’ll want to carefully and diligently define your target patient population. Where do they live? Where do they shop? Which restaurants do they frequent? Identify this population and research them extensively. Take note of their average household income and their average monthly expenditures on medical aesthetics services, among other expenditures. Consider what types of medical aesthetics services they are currently receiving and what types of services they might be interested in. Identifying and characterizing your target population links back to defining your niche market. If you can identify a need in your target patient population that hasn’t been met by the current market, you’ve accomplished the most important—and perhaps the most difficult—part of launching your new practice.

Competition

Identifying and understanding your competitors is a critical factor that will directly impact the success and profitability of your medical aesthetics practice. What types of services and treatment plans do they offer? Are there any specialty practices already in the market that have a main focus, such as body contouring? Be careful and diligent in your research. Identify three to five of the most successful offices in your area, take notes and visit the competition. How long have they been open? How fast are they growing? How many doctors practice in each? How extensive is their support staff? What is their patient retention rate, according to industry reps? By mapping out these details for each of your top competitors, you will begin to understand key elements you want to implement—or not—in your office.

For example, you might hone in on a particularly successful marketing strategy or identify treatment plans that maximize profitability in your area. By thoroughly examining the competition, you’ll be able to learn from their mistakes, streamline processes and shape a successful marketing strategy before ever opening the doors to your own office.

Potential Resources

Once you’ve identified your niche market and target patient population, you’ll want to make sure that the region you’re considering can support your vision. The area where you choose to launch is critical. It will affect your ability to staff, manage and grow your office. What are the local demographics? Your staff’s ability to listen, engage and communicate with your patients is among the most critical aspects that will shape the success of your office. This begins with hiring the right people and training them well. (Click here to read more about the LAER model I developed for effectively training your front office staff here.)

The accessibility of technical support for your medical equipment is another important resource you’ll want to consider. Your equipment and supplies will need regular and established maintenance and support to ensure optimal performance. Most laser companies offer a maintenance plan; however, while it is vital, it is also very expensive. How quickly can support personnel be onsite? Do they offer a loaner?

The potential for collaboration is one last element to consider before making the final decision on where to open your practice. Are there any practices in the area that offer services that would complement your services or specialty? Would a collaboration or referral system make sense? In some cases, it may be more beneficial to work with key competitors rather than against them. There may be an opportunity to offer patients a bundled promotion or personalized treatment plan that successfully incorporates the expertise of both practices. In this way, you are capitalizing on existing resources and building upon them to maximize your profitability and success.

Personal Drive

Your personal drive is another key element that will impact the launch of your medical aesthetics practice. This factor cannot be easily measured or analyzed, but it plays a pivotal role in the success of your practice, particularly in the launch phase. Undoubtedly, launching a new medical practice in any specialty requires not only expertise and knowledge, but also persistence and drive, in both the medical and business fields.

As the medical expert, you’ll be required to know and stay up-to-date on your clinical knowledge. This includes learning new technology, procedures and treatments as they become available, and implementing them in your space.

As the business leader, you’ll be required to make smart decisions and make changes that will support the growth and success of your office. This includes hiring and training medical and administrative staff, implementing efficient processes and protocols, creating and sustaining a successful marketing plan, and consistently achieving new goals in patient retention and conversion, ROI and room revenue assumptions.

Click here to take a look at some of the critical financial numbers that will affect the growth and profitability of your office. To launch and sustain a successful medical aesthetic office in the current market, you will need diligence, tenacity and a great deal of personal drive.

Launching a successful medical aesthetics practice is a challenging but incredibly rewarding experience. Do you have what it takes? Do you have attainable revenue goals and the infrastructure, protocols and staff in place to get you there? Click here to download the assessment and complete Terri’s 10 Point Checklist.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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