Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Join
AmSpa Now
Blog Home All Blogs

Join AmSpa at the L.A. Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, April 3, 2019

la boot camp

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

We are just a few days away from AmSpa’s Los Angeles Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp at the Sofitel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills, and we’re extremely excited for the opportunity to help medical aesthetic professionals develop their practices. There's still time to register for the event—just click here to sign up. Here’s a quick overview of the program:

Friday, April 5

Prior to the Boot Camp, AmSpa will present a special after-hours tour of the Lasky Aesthetics & Laser Center, one of the most successful medical spas in the United States. This event, which is sponsored by BTL Aesthetics, takes place from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. PST and will show attendees how this well-appointed practice makes its clients comfortable while providing a high standard of service. Space for this exciting event is limited, so click here to register.

Saturday, April 6

The Boot Camp begins at 8 a.m. with a breakfast, followed at 8:30 a.m. with my opening keynote. From there, we will move into the main program:

  • 9 – 10:30 a.m.: The Plan, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—What are the most effective ways to develop a business plan for your medical spa? Medical Spa Consultant Bryan Durocher discusses the ins and outs of the planning process and helps determine how long it realistically takes to open a practice.
  • 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.: The Marketing Plan and Social Media, presented by Brandon and Jenny Robinson (Skin Body Soul MedSpa)—This session will help you determine how to most effectively market your medical aesthetic practice using both traditional methods and cutting-edge techniques.
  • 1 – 1:30 p.m.: Medical Aesthetic Hot Topics Panel, featuring Toni Lee Roldan-Ortiz (Environ Skincare) and Tim Sawyer (Crystal Clear Digital Marketing)—This panel, moderated by yours truly, will feature a spirited discussion of the current issues and events that concern medical spa owners and operators.
  • 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.: The Law, presented by Alex Thiersch (AmSpa) and Michael Byrd (ByrdAdatto)—In this presentation, we’ll discuss the long-standing and emerging legal issues that every medical spa owner needs to know about. As you can imagine, there is a lot to cover here, since new concerns seem to be arising daily lately.
  • 4:15 – 5 p.m.: The Treatments, presented by Terri Ross (Lasky Aesthetics)—Learn about the most profitable and popular treatments available to your practice, and find out how to best determine which treatments are right for you based on the state of your practice.
  • 5 – 6 p.m.: The Digital Marketing Ecosystem, presented by Tim Sawyer (Crystal Clear Digital Marketing)—Find out how to effectively spread the word about your medical aesthetic practice and how best to determine what’s working and what’s not. Your practice’s digital presence is more important than ever before, and curating it should be a top priority.

Saturday will wrap up with a cocktail reception from 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 7

Once again, the Boot Camp begins at 8 a.m. with a breakfast.

  • 8:30 – 9 a.m.: Anatomy of a $5-Million Med Spa, presented by Alex Thiersch (AmSpa)—Have you ever wondered what the difference is between your medical spa and one that’s mega-successful? It might be less significant than you think. This presentation will show what a $5-million med spa is doing right—and what you might be doing wrong.
  • 9 – 10 a.m.: The Financials, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—At the end of the day, the money you’re bringing in is the most important measure of your practice’s success. This presentation will, among other things, demonstrate how to properly develop a budget and use metrics to determine your med spa’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.: The Long-term Revenue, presented by Brandon and Jenny Robinson (Skin Body Soul MedSpa)—Simply being successful isn’t enough for a medical aesthetic practice; you have to know how to maintain and grow your success. In this session, the Robinsons will show you how to build patient loyalty and move your business forward.
  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: The Consultation, presented by Terri Ross (Lasky Aesthetics)—As the old saying goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. Learn how to put your best foot forward with effective patient consultations—and how to turn them into consistent business.
  • 1 – 2 p.m.: The Lessons, presented by Louis Frisina—Every medical spa is different, but the successful ones share several common traits. In this session, Business Strategy Consultant Louis Frisina discusses the qualities that are typically found in practices that bring in a significant amount of revenue.
  • 2 – 3 p.m.: The Team, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—A medical spa is only as good as its personnel, so it’s important to make sure that you hire a staff that can do everything you want it to—and more. In this session, you’ll learn about recruiting, hiring and retaining employees who can make your medical spa dreams come true.

Also, you’ll have the chance to visit with a number of exceptional vendors throughout this event. Attend the L.A. Medical Spa Boot Camp to check out the latest and greatest from the following companies:

We hope you can join us in Los Angeles this weekend. This AmSpa Boot Camp is a tremendous opportunity to get your medical aesthetic business headed in the right direction and learn some tips and tricks that can take it to the next level. Click here to register!

Tags:  AmSpa's Med Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps  Business and Financials  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Apply to Join AmSpa’s Mastermind Group Today

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 28, 2019

mastermind group

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Shortly before The Medical Spa Show 2019, I posted in this space about the value and utility of mastermind groups—groups of like-minded business leaders who congregate occasionally to share ideas and encourage each other to address their issues with an entrepreneurial mindset. At The Medical Spa Show, AmSpa announced the Aesthetic Mastermind groups, which provide the benefits of a mastermind experience while addressing the specific issues facing medical spa owners and operators.

The Aesthetic Mastermind is not a standard mastermind group—it is custom-designed for medical aesthetic practice owners. Instead of having one large group, the Aesthetic Mastermind will be split into smaller groups of up to five people; the membership is based on factors such as revenue, location and business stage. (Direct competitors will be added to separate groups.) Each group will challenge owners to not only maintain sensible, realistic business plans based on reliable metrics, but also expand their visions in order to become an even more effective entrepreneur.

Each group begins with a three-day, two-night “Vision Quest” retreat. This gathering will feature an experienced business coach and is designed to help group members step back from their day-to-day businesses and create a rapport with their fellow owners, share their business experiences and learn about the industry from a number of different perspectives. After the Vision Quest, the group will meet once a month, 11 times per year, via teleconference; each meeting will include the business coach to keep the group on track and “hot seat” sessions for each member. Before the actual meeting, a guest from the industry will speak about his or her experience and field questions from group members.

Watch business coach Wendy Collier discuss the Aesthetic Mastermind in this brief video.

This package costs $7,995 for the entire year, though AmSpa Members will receive an additional $500 off. Importantly, the Vision Quest’s lodging, meals and program materials are included in this cost; airfare is not included, but AmSpa can provide booking assistance for your flights.

Prospective group members must complete an application so that they are placed in groups that can effectively address their professional needs. Click here to fill out the application.

May 1 is the deadline for registration for the first session of the Aesthetic Mastermind, so fill out your application today and become a part of this exciting project. You won’t find a better opportunity to learn about the medical aesthetic industry from your peers in a format that encourages entrepreneurship, so act now.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  The Medical Spa Show 2019 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Capturing Your Captive Audience

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, March 26, 2019

computer software

By Tyler Terry, vice president of sales, TouchMD

Medical aesthetic practices spend a lot of their money and resources on marketing to attract patients to their practice, as well as on a savvy website to sell patients on why to choose them over their competition. All this results in a patient scheduling a consult. What happens next is where most practices “strike out looking.”

I've been in more than 400 cosmetic practices spanning more than 40 states across the country, and the problem is always the same: Patients—your captive audience—are either on their smartphones or reading magazines in both the waiting and consultation rooms. They are literally waiting to be sold on whatever product, procedure and/or service that attracted them to your office in the first place. Wouldn't their time be better spent learning about that product, procedure or service? This surely would prepare them to ask better questions and participate in a more efficient and effective consult. Sure, most patients are already sold on Botox, but why wouldn't you give them the opportunity to engage with and learn about the new laser you just purchased or any specials or events that are coming up?

Brag books and brochures were sufficient back in the early 2000s, but it's time to retire them both and invest in technology that will enhance the patient experience and showcase the products, procedures and services that your practice offers. You can start by adding a waiting room solution consisting of either a patient-friendly app for patients to download and watch videos and look at before-and-after pictures, a waiting room loop system to stream educational and promotional content, and/or a tablet with which patients can interact. The same concept applies to your consult room—take advantage of any downtime the patient might have while he or she is waiting.

Here are a few ways to implement captive audience experiences:

  • In-house marketing: Utilize promotional videos and images to educate patients about services you offer.
  • Visual consultation: Everyone is a visual learner—combine videos, images, before-and-after galleries, and educational content into a patient education platform.
  • Patient education: Allow the patients the opportunity to relive the consultation at home using software. Your patients can review drawings, signed consents, operational instructions and custom educational videos.

The captive audience experience is too often forgotten or left out of the equation. It's an easy fix with the right technology.

TouchMD is a visual consultation, marketing and imaging software utilizing touch-screen technology that enhances the patient experience with proven revenue generation. To learn more about TouchMD or request a demo, please email tyler@touchmd.com.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Guest Post  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why a Risk Assessment Is Critical for Your Practice

Posted By Administration, Monday, March 25, 2019

checklist risk assessment

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

For a medical aesthetics practice to best serve its patients and maintain a viable business, it needs to understand the ways in which it may be compromising patient safety or otherwise violating the law. Therefore, if your practice has not undergone a thorough risk assessment recently, it should do so as soon as possible.

“A risk assessment establishes the baseline of where a practice is from a compliance perspective and helps identify risk areas that need to be fixed,” said Michael Byrd, partner at ByrdAdatto, a Dallas-based law firm that specializes in business and health care law. “Let’s get a baseline of where you are so we can figure out what needs to happen.”

A properly conducted risk assessment will cover both business and medical concerns, and it will identify areas where the practice is compliant, areas where the practice needs to be mindful to remain in compliance, and areas where the practice is not compliant that need to be corrected.

“A risk assessment is essentially a blend of legal and clinical evaluation of compliance,” Byrd said. “From a legal perspective, we’re making sure that the ownership is set up in a compliant way, and then that the policies and procedures are set up in a compliant manner. Clinically, do they have appropriate policies and procedures as it relates to treatment, delegation and supervision, OSHA, telemedicine, HIPAA, etc.? A lot of times when we’re doing a risk assessment, we have a lawyer look at it, plus a clinical person, and sometimes even an IT person helping to evaluate if there’s a cyber-security risk from a HIPAA perspective.”

To begin the process of conducting a risk assessment, a practice should engage with a health care law firm that has a great deal of experience conducting such investigations. Additionally, stakeholders need to be prepared to be as open as possible so evaluators can get a clear idea of what is going on at the practice.

“We’ll identify the ownership documents to send us, and then if it’s a full risk assessment, we’ll involve a clinical consultant who’ll look at it from a clinical perspective, and then we’ll work together to make sure that the policies and procedures navigate that particular state’s laws,” Byrd said. “There’s a big element of knowing who’s doing the initial exams and who can be delegated to provide the treatment, and even by procedure, there are certain procedures that are only appropriate for certain providers. That’s a lot of the back and forth we’ll have with the consultant.”

If this sounds like a major undertaking, well… it is. However, it is assuredly better to know the areas in which your practice falls short of compliance and what can be done to correct that rather than remain ignorant and be surprised when an investigation uncovers violations.

“It can be overwhelming, but if it can be integrated as part of the culture of the business, our clients are very successful,” Byrd said. “A risk assessment is really just a starting point, but then you have a culture of following these procedures and evaluating as laws change, technology and procedures change, and your personnel changes, evolving your compliance plan with that. The clients that adopt that as part of the culture of their business have been really successful in minimizing that risk.”

Byrd says that after his firm conducts a risk assessment, it typically will check in with clients every three months to make sure that everything is on track. If a firm does not offer periodic check-ins, he recommends repeating the risk assessment process annually.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Compliance is Cool  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

What Is a Mastermind Group?

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 5, 2019

By: Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

In business, every idea is valuable. Internal brainstorming can only offer you so much, since it may reflect your company’s corporate culture in ways that limit its efficacy. However, from day-to-day, you are likely far too busy managing the operations of your business to seek out and consider ideas from outside your immediate circle. Therefore, it is important for business leaders to seek out ways to interact with peers from around the world in order to help develop new ideas and keep their companies on the cutting edge of their markets.

Participation in mastermind groups is a very successful way business leaders develop new and exciting ideas. Initially named by noted self-help author Napoleon Hill in 1925, this concept involves a group of entrepreneurs who get together to give each other support, talk about their business, knock each other down and build each other up, and make themselves available as resources. This idea isn’t exactly new—for example, Benjamin Franklin founded a group called the Junto in 1727 that was designed to provide mutual improvement for its members. Franklin was inspired by numerous other similar groups throughout history. Nowadays, these groups convene once a month, usually as a teleconference, and during the meetings, each person will be given a limited amount of time on the “hot seat,” when his or her ideas are reviewed and evaluated.

However, the structures of such meetings and even of the groups themselves are flexible and can be amended to better reflect the circumstances in which they exist. In the aesthetics industry, for example, many resources are available to practice owners and operators, but much of the information out there is very topical and may have limited utility for many members of the group. Therefore, a mastermind group based in the medical aesthetics industry might hypothetically benefit from a certain amount of curation—the groups should be kept small and grouped according to factors such as revenue, location, business cycle, personality, etc. Because the groups are small, the members can go into greater depth during their “hot seat” segments and learn more about issues endemic to their particular section of the industry. What’s more, these groups should also consider having a business coach in order to help group members get into an entrepreneurial mindset to better build their companies.

People who have participated in mastermind groups typically give the process positive evaluations. When knowledge is coordinated in such a way, it provides tangible benefits to those who participate, and helps create accountability that often carries over to members’ standard business. These groups can also help members look at problems and develop solutions in ways they wouldn’t have otherwise, and encourage participants to reach for levels of success that they may previously have thought unobtainable.

If you find the idea of mastermind groups intriguing or potentially beneficial for your business, be sure to keep an eye on the news that comes out following The Medical Spa Show 2019, which takes place at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, February 8 – 10. 

Tags:  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Should Your Med Spa Offer Aesthetician Services?

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, January 29, 2019

By: Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

While medical spa services command higher prices than traditional spa treatments, medical spa owners and operators shouldn’t overlook aesthetician services. These can be lucrative opportunities for added services for your patients, increasing both retention and profitability of your med spa practice.

What Can Aestheticians Do For You?

According to the American Med Spa Association’s 2017 Medical Spa State of the Industry Report, aesthetician services were one of the leading revenue-generators in medical spas. These treatments can include facials, aesthetician-grade chemical peels, and waxing, to name a few. This category also includes Hydrafacials, which is one of the fastest-growing treatments in medical spas regardless of practitioner type.

Some Caveats

In many states, treatments such as microneedling and dermaplaning are considered to be the practice of medicine. Because of this, they should only be done by a licensed medical professional. However, there are some situations in which a person holding an aesthetician license may perform these procedures.


Microblading is also a treatment that individuals holding aesthetician licenses perform in many states. State laws can vary regarding this procedure, but it is often categorized as permanent makeup and, with some additional training, these practitioners can often offer this service in medical spas.

Contact an attorney familiar with medical aesthetic laws in your state for more information on microneedling, dermaplaning, or microblading. (AmSpa members can take advantage of their annual complimentary compliance consult with the law firm of ByrdAdatto, or check their medical aesthetic state legal summary.)

Legal Requirements
To add these aesthetician services to your medical spa, first be sure that the practitioners you hire are properly licensed to perform these treatments. This should be of paramount importance for all of your service providers, whether offering beauty services or medical treatments. In-depth training and proper licensure ensures that your patients are getting the best possible services and results, and also protects your staff and business against fines and other punishments from regulatory agencies. Your business will also need to obtain an establishment license for these procedures, and that license must be displayed in your facility during business hours. Additionally, be sure to double check with your insurance-provider to make sure you are covered to offer these additional treatments. Assuming that your other business housekeeping is in order (LLC, tax ID, etc.), you should now be set to offer another tier of services to your clients.

For more information on medical spa legal best-practices attend The Medical Spa Show 2019 or one of AmSpa’s Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps.

Tags:  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Trends  The Medical Spa Show 2019 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Dermaplaning: Surgery or a Close Shave? Part 2

Posted By Administration, Friday, January 4, 2019

By Patrick O’Brien, J.D., Legal Coordinator for the American Med Spa Association

This is a continuation of a piece on post on dermaplaning. To read the first part of this blog, click here.

How have other states approached dermaplaning and its perceived duality? Other states have approached this dual nature of dermaplaning as both a cosmetic treatment and a medical procedure by permitting cosmetologists and estheticians to perform dermaplaning but only under the supervision of a physician.  Utah is one such state, they allow master estheticians to perform dermaplaning under the direct supervision of a health care practitioner.

The layer of skin effected is not the only area of concern for Dermaplaning.  In states such as Texas estheticians and cosmetologists are permitted to perform microdermabrasion procedures as long as they only remove dead skin cells.  This is similar to some of the previously listed states.  However, Texas estheticians and cosmetologists are not allowed to perform dermaplaning regardless of the layer of skin effected.  The reason is that using a bladed implement on the face is considered shaving and only barbers are licensed to shave the face.  The similarity to shaving is also at play in New Jersey where barbers and master barbers can perform dermaplaning. 

It appears that most states have at least some restriction that limit or prohibit esthetician’s and cosmetologist’s ability to dermaplane. Some strictly limit the depth of skin that can be affected.  Some make it a medical procedure and require that it be performed under medical supervision or by medical practitioners.  Medical spas that are considering offering dermaplaning services should certainly review their own state’s specific rules on the procedure (AmSpa Members can refer to your state’s summary here). 

Tags:  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Dermaplaning: Surgery or a Close Shave? Part 1

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 3, 2019

By Patrick O’Brien, J.D., Legal Coordinator for the American Med Spa Association

Dermaplaning over the last couple of years has become one of the most popular procedures offered in medical spas. There are, however, differing opinions on who may do the procedure and whether or not it is medical in nature. Let’s take a brief look at how different states treat dermaplaning and some consideration if you plan to offer dermaplaning in your medical spa.

Before we dive into the details let’s do an overview of what is dermaplaning. Dermaplaning is a form of mechanical exfoliation. It typically involves a bladed instrument (often a #10 scalpel) used to scrape off the dead layer of skin and small hairs from a person’s face. The patient is left with more vibrant and even looking skin. In that respect it is similar to microdermabrasion treatments in that it should only remove the stratum corneum (outermost layer of skin).

Dermaplaning has the added benefit of have much lower equipment costs since it needs only a scalpel to perform as opposed to more elaborate machinery. This difference in equipment can complicate who may perform the procedure, as we will see later.

Since the procedure is intended to only effect the stratum corneum layer of the skin and not any lower it would seem that estheticians or cosmetologists would be able to perform these procedures as part of their practice of beautifying and enhancement of skin that we find in many state’s statutes. This is the case in Ohio were dermaplaning is permitted provided it only removes the cells from the top layer of skin. Dermaplaning (or using a blade) that removes skin cells below the stratum corneum is specifically listed as a prohibited act in the Ohio Board of Cosmetology rules. Tennessee likewise prohibits any type of skin removal technique that effects the living layer of facial skin. Minnesota allows their master estheticians perform treatments on the epidermal layer which is a deeper level than the stratum corneum and so they are allowed to dermaplane.

The depth of a few skin cells can seem like a very narrow margin between what is permitted or prohibited. Other states such as California have come down on the other side line and consider it a strictly medical procedure. In their rules California not only specifically lists “exfoliation below the epidermis” as an “Invasive Procedures” but also consider the removal of skin by a razor-edged tool to also be “invasive.” Illinois similarly prohibits cosmetologists and estheticians from performing dermaplaning and instead consider it a medical procedure. Likewise, South Dakota prohibits estheticians and cosmetologists from performing “invasive” procedures and specifically counts dermaplaning among them in an advisory statement. And in Montana’s administrative rules they define “dermaplane” as being performed by a physician.

Stay tuned for part 2 of “Dermaplaning: Surgery or a Close Shave?” tomorrow!

Tags:  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Who Can Perform Aquagold Fine Touch Procedures?

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 11, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Aquagold Fine Touch is a channeling device offered for sale by Aquavit Pharmaceuticals that has become extremely popular in the medical aesthetics industry. It delivers micro-droplets of a variety of drugs—typically including Botox and other toxins, as well as fillers—into the skin. What’s more, its manufacturer claims the treatments it provides are pain-free.

Unlike a typical Botox treatment, in which the drug is directly injected and paralyzes the muscle, an Aquagold Fine Touch treatment is essentially microneedling. It delivers tiny amounts of the drug with which it is loaded over a wide area—much wider than a Botox treatment can manage. It is suitable for sensitive areas where Botox is impractical or impossible, such as the neck, and because the doses are much smaller than typical toxin treatments, it tends to result in skin that looks more natural and vibrant. Patients who wish to avoid the “frozen” look that Botox and other toxins often produce are embracing this technology.

As is typically the case when such a product emerges, we at AmSpa are getting a ton of questions about who can actually perform Aquagold Fine Touch procedures. The treatment appears to be very straightforward—a provider simply applies the device to the skin like a stamp. Its simplicity raises an obvious question: Can an esthetician or licensed vocational nurse (LVN) perform this procedure?

It’s good that we’re getting these questions because it shows that medical spa owners and operators care about remaining compliant, but because technology moves faster than the law, it’s sometimes difficult to determine what the answers are when new technology emerges. However, we can use what we know about similar treatments and technologies to determine the most prudent course of action until government agencies make their rulings.

Simply put, the Aquagold Fine Touch is essentially a microneedling device, so a lot of the issues we’ve addressed in recent years regarding microneedling are likely also going to apply to it. Every state that has looked into microneedling has found it to be a medical treatment, so a good-faith exam must be performed before the procedure, and if a doctor is not administering the treatment him- or herself, it must be properly delegated.

Unfortunately for practices that would like to use unlicensed practitioners to perform Aquagold Fine Touch procedures, this takes them out of the scopes of practice for estheticians and LVNs. In addition, the fact that Botox and fillers are being administered raises the question of whether or not this represents an injection and, therefore, if it can be administered only by a registered nurse or, in some cases, a nurse practitioner, physician assistant or physician.

The only conclusion we can draw with any sort of certainty is that Aquagold Fine Touch will be regulated in much the same way as microneedling, both in terms of medical board rulings and FDA approval, which has become a bit of a sticking point for microneedling products recently. Additionally, mixing different drugs together, as many doctors do with the Aquagold Fine Touch device, may represent a violation of pharmaceutical regulations, as many IV bars are finding out. Does a practice need to be registered as a pharmacy and have pharmaceutical oversight? Can nurses do it? Can LPNs? Who is qualified, capable and allowed to do this under the law?

Unfortunately, I don’t have all these answers at the moment, but I am going to find out, so stay tuned to AmSpa for more about Aquagold Fine Touch treatments. Thus far, it has been very safe and very well received, but the industry needs to have a firmer grasp on the regulatory issues surrounding it.

Tags:  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Microblading Training Offered at The Medical Spa Show 2019

Posted By Administration, Friday, December 7, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Microblading is here to stay. A semi-permanent beautification technique that is typically used to improve the perceived thickness of patients’ eyebrows, microblading is a treatment in which technicians create superficial cuts near the surface of the skin and fill them with pigment, creating the illusion of fuller hair. It is an exciting treatment that is becoming quite popular—in fact, according to the 2017 State of the Medical Spa Industry Report conducted by AmSpa, microblading is the fastest-growing new treatment in the industry, with revenue produced by it increasing approximately 40% from year to year. 

However, it is also worth noting that AmSpa’s study found that only around 25% of medical spas offer microblading. That number seems to be rising, but the market for this service is also growing, and enterprising practices stand to make a great deal of money with it, since it is absurdly inexpensive to the practice—all it requires is a disposable device that costs around $5. What’s more, in many states a practice typically does not need a doctor or a medically licensed practitioner to perform these treatments, thus keeping their practical costs low. However, medical spas can charge upwards of $500 for microblading services, so practices can reap very high profit margins when it is administered. Patients like it because it is simple and semi-permanent, making it a much more palatable solution than tattooing, which has been used in the past for the same purpose; microblading also tends to look a bit more natural.

I’ve been told by medical aesthetic professionals that eyebrows are the new lips, so microblading is something that medical spa owners who want to advance their practices should definitely consider exploring.

Educate yourself

Because microblading is so potentially lucrative, AmSpa is offering a one-day microblading training course at The Medical Spa Show 2019 in Las Vegas, which takes place on February 7, 2019. It is presented by Maegen Kennedy from Fleek Brows Microblading in Orlando, FL, who has been training people to perform this technique for several years. She is a board-certified physician assistant and licensed tattoo artist whose experience in the field can help newcomers understand the ins and outs of the microblading process. Visit medicalspashow.com or americanmedspa.org to learn more about this opportunity.

The micro print

If you are considering joining AmSpa and Maegen for this course, you should probably be aware ahead of time that because the microblading process is so similar to that of tattooing, most states that have issued rulings on the matter of who can legally perform these treatments have declared that a tattooing or body art license is required to perform it. 

If your practice is located in one of these states, you and your employees would need to obtain these licenses (if you don’t already have them) in order to perform microblading treatments in a medical spa. This might sound like a bit of a hassle, but earning a tattooing license is often surprisingly simple. Consult a local health care attorney to learn how you and your employees can get tattooing licenses in your state or city. (Author’s note: The American Med Spa Association (AmSpa) works with a national law firm that focuses on medical aesthetic legalities and, as a member, along with a number of other great benefits, you receive a discount off of your initial consultation. To learn more, log on to www.americanmedspa.org.)

If you need to know anything else about this topic, you can learn more about microblading at AmSpa’s consumer treatment website

Microblading training is highly sought after, and this is a great chance to learn about a type of treatment that could make a big difference for a practice’s bottom line. Join AmSpa and Maegen Kennedy in Las Vegas to learn how your medical spa can hit the jackpot with microblading.

Tags:  Med Spa Trends  The Medical Spa Show 2019 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 13 of 15
 |<   <<   <  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15
Contact Us

224 N Desplaines, Ste. 300
 Chicago, IL 60661

Phone: 312-981-0993

Fax: 888-827-8860

Mission

AmSpa provides legal, compliance, and business resources for medical spas and medical aesthetic practices.

Follow Us: