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Invest in Quality Internet Marketing for Your Medical Spa

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 11, 2019

online marketing

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

Online presence is one of the most critical elements of a successful marketing program. In the era of technology, many—if not most—prospective patients will first come across your office through an Internet search. Your website must be eye-catching, professional and thorough. It should paint the complete picture of your office: individualized services, state-of-the-art technology and professional staff. In the first few seconds of accessing your website, prospective patients will form an opinion of your office. Therefore, it is critical to invest in high-quality website engineers, content writers and marketing personnel. (Click here to read more about how internet marketing ties into a successful marketing program).

With internet marketing especially, you may be tempted to find ways to cut corners and lower your overall costs. However, doing so will substantially weaken your marketing program and cut into your overall profitability. Invest in a high-quality, experienced marketing team to build a solid online platform for your medical aesthetics practice. The rewards will far outweigh the cost.

Initialization

Invest in high-quality website engineers or staff from the get-go. While you may be able to find companies to create a website for a low price, the product reflects the cost. And it’s far more complicated to scrap a website and create a new one, especially when you consider that it needs to be properly integrated into search engines such as Google. The takeaway message here is that you’ll spend more money hiring the right team to correct a poorly formed and developed website than you will if you pay to have it done right the first time.

Structure

Your website needs to be clean, professional and easy to navigate. Steer clear of flashy designs and complicated navigational tools. You want prospective patients to navigate your website with ease so they can quickly and efficiently learn about the services, products and technology you offer. Make it easy to return to the homepage by having a banner on each page. Keep in mind that many people will access your website through a mobile device, so you’ll want to make sure your website can adapt to any screen. Lastly, make your contact information easily accessible, either in the footer or in the main menu. You don’t want prospective patients to struggle to find ways to get more information or reach out to your office. Make it obvious. Read more about these and other ways to improve your website design in this article from the Huffington Post.

Content

Aside from a clean and professional design, the content is the most critical component of your website. It won’t mean much that your website is easy to navigate if the pages don’t lead to well-developed, informative content. Your website should effectively illustrate all the key details of your office—your services, technology and staff—in a consolidated space. This means you’ll need to invest in highly talented writers and content developers. Writers can either be hired in-house or contracted out. Either way, be careful in your selection; ideally, you want professionals with experience in both the writing and medical fields. Your website content needs to be original—not duplicated from a similar site—in order to be searchable on platforms such as Google. Well-developed website content also will contain robust inbound/outbound links, as well as searchable keywords, phrases and page titles. (Click here to read more about how to successfully incorporate SEO elements into your website content). The takeaway here is that the content on your website needs to be original, professional and searchable.

Link Development

High-quality content goes hand in hand with proper link development. Inbound links are like the gateway to your office—you want them to be logical, well-placed and natural. Ideally, the team you hire for website initialization and content development will have experience in link building. Beware of companies that sell inexpensive links in bulk. More is not always better—in many cases, these bulk-type links are poorly developed and placed on totally unrelated pages, negatively impacting your presence on search engines such as Google. The cost to repair this damage will far exceed the cost of having an experienced SEO team develop high-quality links the first time around.

Return on Investment

There are several important numbers you need to know to track the progress of your marketing program, as outlined in this article. As with every marketing avenue, you’ll need to know your internet marketing return on investment (ROI) every quarter. How many prospective patients first learn about your office through an online search? How many patients inquire about your services through website forms? These are key numbers that will help you determine your projected and actual ROI.

They’ll also help you plan for the future and tailor your marketing program to the times. For example, if you notice a 50% decrease in the number of prospective patients visiting your website, you may need to invest more in SEO and link development. An increased number of well-placed and tailored inbound links will lead to increased online traffic, contributing to your overall visibility. The idea is that this will ultimately lead to increased patient conversion. Keeping track of the numbers allows you to gauge the success of your online marketing plan and implement targeted changes to improve your online presence.

Online marketing is a central element of your marketing program. Invest in a high-quality professional team to develop and maintain a clean, informative and well-guided website.

Click here to complete Terri's 10-point checklist.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  Terri Ross Consulting 

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QP Extra: Q&A with Chris Bailey of Ovation Med Spa

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 6, 2019

chis bailey

When Chris Bailey founded his medical spa in 2006, he was new to the industry. The practice was a franchise, though, so he felt he could count on the support of the franchisor. Six months after the practice opened, however, the franchisor went out of business, so Bailey picked up the phone and called every medical aesthetics professional he could track down, asking those who would talk to him about every aspect of the business. He developed a number of long-term relationships with highly respected members of the industry and, before long, his practice—renamed Ovation Med Spa—was thriving. Bailey spoke with AmSpa Content Writer/Editor Michael Meyer about how he and his practice rebounded from a rocky start to become one of the most successful medical spas in the Houston area.

Michael Meyer: What inspired you to open your practice?

Chris Bailey: I spent 15 or 16 years in corporate America and I was getting burned out. I was bored. Fourteen or 15 years ago, I was in LaGuardia Airport a couple of weeks before Christmas, coming home from a client meeting. I'm looking around the airport, and there are people 10 or 20 years older than me, and I'm just sitting there thinking, “I can't be doing the same thing in 10 years or 20 years.” And I remember standing at the magazine rack and flipping through Entrepreneur magazine—the Franchise 500 edition—thinking, “I don't want to make sandwiches, I don't want to be a janitor and I probably don't want to own a daycare.” And then I saw some medical spa franchises, and I'm like, “Huh—that's interesting. People are getting older, and they don't want to look older. Maybe I should look into this.” I started doing a bunch of research, and a year and all my money later, I opened our business. That's where it started.

MM: What would you say is different about your practice now versus when you opened it?

CB: We opened about 13 years ago, and at the time, you could categorize what we did as skin rejuvenation. We did injectables, we did IPL and different things for skin rejuvenation. Body contouring wasn't really even a category yet, because there were no devices that really did it. Today, we do everything from skin rejuvenation, body contouring, vaginal rejuvenation, erectile dysfunction, hormone replacement—it's really the gamut of anything you can do nonsurgically to someone to make them look or feel better.

MM: What is your most popular treatment, and what brings in the most revenue?

CB: The most popular treatment can vary by season. Certain times of the year, our Sciton Halo is very popular for skin rejuvenation; we get to the summer and that's not quite as popular. We do a lot of CoolSculpting. We do a lot of Emsculpt treatments—the new body contouring device. One of the fastest-growing segments has been vaginal rejuvenation, which has been kind of surprising to all of us.

What brings in the most revenue? We're pretty balanced. It's probably a fairly even mix between skin rejuvenation and body contouring. And things like vaginal rejuvenation and hormone replacement are smaller percentages but growing.

MM: What would you say is the most important factor to your success?

CB: I think some of it is that we've continued to innovate. We have close to 40 different FDA-approved devices; I think the average medical spa might have three or four. We have always stayed on top of technology, and we have multiple options to do similar things. We've never wanted to be in the position where someone comes in and we have to tell them, “You need x, and y happens to be the only thing we have.” We're in a unique position where we can truly customize treatment plans for people based on their needs because we've got all kinds of different technology to accomplish that.

MM: What sets your medical spa apart from others?

CB: I think some of it is what I was just talking about—the continuous innovation and the technology that we have. No one has the technology we have, I don't think, anywhere in the country. And then you marry that with our outstanding service providers—we've got employees who've been with us since day one, for 13 years, and we've got very low turnover. Our staff is excellent. They get great training, and they do great treatments, and they provide great customer service. We have customers that we've literally had for 13 years, since we opened our doors. Our unique selling proposition is that we don't sell a one-size-fits-all solution—we can truly customize treatment plans for what people actually need.

MM: Who inspires you?

CB: My father has always inspired me. He is probably the person, from when I was a young child, who taught me to dream bigger dreams, think big and believe we can do things beyond what we are doing today. He's always been an inspiration my life.

MM: What do you love most about aesthetics?

CB: I think some of it is the opportunity—and this is always hard to say without offending someone—to help people become what they believe are better versions of themselves. It's just fun to have someone come in, unhappy with some aspect of how they feel or how they look, and be able to make a positive change and have them be happy that they were able to accomplish that. That's one of the most fun things about it.

MM: What do you love about being an entrepreneur?

CB: Some of it is the constant challenge and the constant change and the constant need to be creative and innovate. If we think about how the aesthetics market has changed in the 13 years we've been in it, it's so amazing. It's different this year than it was last year. It changes so rapidly, and it continues to change. That constant challenge is what keeps me engaged.

ovation med spa

MM: What was the goal with the spa design you chose?

CB: We don't want to look like a medical office, and, and we don't necessarily look like a real frou-frou spa. Our design is clean and efficient. We're not trying to look like the Taj Mahal, but we want an efficient, clean, visually appealing space. But we don't want you to think you're in your family practice doctor's office either.

MM: What advice would you give to medical spa owners?

CB: Keep your overhead low—as low as possible—and network with as many different people around the country as you can who do similar things as you. When I started this company, we actually had purchased a franchise. I spent all the money I had and borrowed more money than anyone should have let me, and we started this franchise. Six months after we opened our doors, the franchisor went out of business. And so here I am—I paid all this money for all this help, training and assistance I was promised, and it's now vanished. But I have no other choice—I have to make this work because I'm deeply in debt at that point and have no job. So, I literally got on the phone and called anyone in the country who would talk to me just to ask questions. Because of that, I've developed some great long-term relationships with some very top-end doctors in the aesthetics world that have really been beneficial to me.

What's interesting about that story is no one in Houston would talk to me, and I still find that fascinating—in the business world, we talked to our competitors, and we understood they're competitors, but we would talk and share ideas. Entering this medical space, it was, at least on a local level, a very closed community, especially to someone who wasn't a medical provider coming into it.

Because of all that pain and suffering I had to go through in the beginning to survive and make relationships, we've had some opportunities that just never would have come along otherwise. As an example, as a non-doctor, I was the first person in the country to have the Emsculpt device. I had developed a relationship with the people at BTL, and they knew we were innovative, and they loaned us one in the very beginning to try to help figure out what it did. And so, I'm the only non-medical person listed on some of these published studies for the Emsculpt. Those kinds of opportunities really stem back to those early days of networking with people around the country and building our reputation through asking for and sharing ideas with people. My business wouldn't exist had I not been able to network and do those things early on.

I get calls all the time, and I'm always willing to talk to anyone who wants to call and ask questions, because I did the same thing. It's surprising to me how many people either are afraid to reach out and ask questions or assume that they won't help you because you’re a competitor. I laugh at that. I'm in Houston, Texas, right? If every aesthetic facility in the city was running at full capacity, we couldn't serve everyone who wants treatment. It's just not even possible. It's millions of people, and I just laugh sometimes when people are so worried about competition. Just do a better job. If you do a great job, there's plenty of business for everyone. As an industry, we can make the entire industry better if we actually talk to each other and help each other.

AmSpa members receive QP every quarter. Click here to learn how to become a member and make your med spa the next aesthetic success story.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends  QP 

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Join AmSpa at the Dallas Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 4, 2019

dallas texas

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, CEO of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Starting next Saturday, September 14, AmSpa will host its Dallas Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp at the Doubletree Dallas Campbell Centre. We’re extremely excited for the opportunity to help medical aesthetic professionals in the Lone Star State develop their practices, and we can’t wait to once again visit Big D. There’s still time to register for the event—just click here to sign up.

Here is a quick overview of the program:

Saturday, September 14

The Boot Camp begins at 8 a.m. with a continental breakfast, followed at 8:30 a.m. with my opening keynote. From there, we will move into the main program:

  • 9 – 10:30 a.m.: The Plan, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—What are the most effective ways to develop a business plan for your medical spa? Medical Spa Consultant Bryan Durocher discusses the ins and outs of the planning process and helps determine how long it realistically takes to open a practice.
  • 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.: The Lessons, presented by Louis Frisina—Every medical spa is different, but the successful ones share several common traits. In this session, Business Strategy Consultant Louis Frisina discusses the qualities that are typically found in practices that bring in a significant amount of revenue.
  • 12:45 – 1:30 p.m.: Medical Aesthetic Hot Topics Panel, featuring Tim Sawyer (Crystal Clear Digital Marketing), Bobby Calhoun (Environ Skincare), and Jamie Bergeron (Bellus Medical) and Page Piland (Galderma)—This panel, moderated by yours truly, will feature a spirited discussion of the current issues and events that concern medical spa owners and operators.
  • 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.: The Law, presented by Alex Thiersch (AmSpa) and Bradford Adatto (ByrdAdatto)—In this presentation, we’ll discuss the long-standing and emerging legal issues that every medical spa owner needs to know about. As you can imagine, there is a lot to cover here, since new concerns seem to be arising daily lately.
  • 4:15 – 5 p.m.: The Treatments, presented by Terri Ross (Terri Ross Consulting)—Learn about the most profitable and popular treatments available to your practice, and find out how to best determine which treatments are right for you based on the state of your practice.
  • 5 – 6 p.m.: The Digital Marketing Ecosystem, presented by Tim Sawyer (Crystal Clear Digital Marketing)—Find out how to effectively spread the word about your medical aesthetic practice and how best to determine what’s working and what’s not. Your practice’s digital presence is more important than ever before, and curating it should be a top priority.

Saturday will wrap up with a cocktail reception from 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, September 15

Once again, the Boot Camp begins at 8 a.m. with a continental breakfast.

  • 8:30 – 9 a.m.: Anatomy of a $5-Million Med Spa, presented by Alex Thiersch (AmSpa)—Have you ever wondered what the difference is between your medical spa and one that’s mega-successful? It might be less significant than you think. This presentation will show what a $5-million med spa is doing right—and what you might be doing wrong.
  • 9 – 10 a.m.: The Financials, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—At the end of the day, the money you’re bringing in is the most important measure of your practice’s success. This presentation will, among other things, demonstrate how to properly develop a budget and use metrics to determine your med spa’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.: The Long-term Revenue, presented by Brandon and Jenny Robinson (Skin Body Soul MedSpa)—Simply being successful isn’t enough for a medical aesthetic practice; you have to know how to maintain and grow your success. In this session, Brandon and Jenny will show you how to build patient loyalty and move your business forward.
  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: The Consultation, presented by Terri Ross (Terri Ross Consulting)—As the old saying goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. Learn how to put your best foot forward with effective patient consultations—and how to turn them into consistent business.
  • 1 – 2 p.m.: The Marketing Plan and Social Media, presented by Brandon and Jenny Robinson (Skin Body Soul MedSpa)—This session will help you determine how to most effectively market your medical aesthetic practice using both traditional methods and cutting-edge techniques.
  • 2 – 3 p.m.: The Team, presented by Bryan Durocher (Durocher Enterprises)—A medical spa is only as good as its personnel, so it’s important to make sure that you hire a staff that can do everything you want it to—and more. In this session, you’ll learn about recruiting, hiring and retaining employees who can make your medical spa dreams come true.

Also, you’ll have the chance to visit with a number of exceptional vendors during this event. Attend the Seattle Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp to check out the latest and greatest from the following companies:

We hope you can join us in Dallas next weekend. This Boot Camp is a tremendous opportunity to get a medical aesthetic business started off on the right foot, as well as learn how to take an already successful business to the next level. Click here to register!

Tags:  AmSpa's Med Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps  Business and Financials  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Ownership  Med Spa Trends 

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QP Extra: Q&A with Terri Ross of Lasky Aesthetics and Laser Center

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 30, 2019

terri ross

When Lasky Aesthetics and Laser Center opened in 2010, it was a much different business than the $3-million-per-year Beverly Hills fixture it has become. In fact, it struggled mightily until medical spa professional Terri Ross joined the practice as managing partner. AmSpa Content Writer/Editor Michael Meyer spoke with Ross—who now operates Terri Ross Consulting—about her role in turning Lasky Aesthetics into one of the most successful medical aesthetic practices in this beauty-obsessed city.

Michael Meyer: What's different about the practice now versus when you started working there?

Terri Ross: All of the owners are physicians who practice offsite and in different specialties—cosmetic dermatology to facial plastic surgeons and a general plastic. They opened the business in 2010 to keep everything in house and refer their patients to the nonsurgical aspect of the business, but it was poorly run. It was a grassroots operation at the time with two employees, no website, no system, no infrastructure—no nothing, which was why they hired me. They invested a lot of money, and at the time it was only generating under a half a million. So, I basically came in and treated it like a startup. I think the takeaway is that there's so much opportunity to grow, but you have to have the proper structure internally to do that.

MM: What do you think is the most important factor to your success?

TR: I think you need to have an operational savvy business. You have to train your providers, train your staff, which is an investment, and which is what I see not happening. You have to have the proper software to track and measure your data. You have to have a high-performing website—it’s your virtual brochure on the outside. And then when patients come in the door, you really need five-star customer service to be different.

MM: What is your unique service proposition?

TR: Aside from the physicians and their pedigree and their background, which has credibility, I would say it's our protocols. You can't come into our center without a consultation. We charge for the consultation. You can't get a treatment without prepping beforehand. We have a very systematic approach, which ultimately retains the patients, and they have better outcomes.

MM: What specific metrics do you use to determine success?

TR: We look at the number of new leads coming in. We measure conversion ratios. We measure revenue per hour per provider. We measure no-show rates. We measure retention. Those are the top KPIs.

MM: What's the metric that you look at more than any other?

TR: At the end of the day, revenue. I look at what our goals are for the month, and I look at revenue, new patient acquisition and conversion.

MM: Who Inspires you and why?

TR: Brené Brown. Tony Robbins. I think that it's all about gratitude. It's all about living your best life. It's all about determination. It's all about how failing is okay. Making mistakes is how you grow. And this is a very competitive environment. It's a very commoditized environment, especially where I'm located in Beverly Hills, and it's the ability to seize opportunity.

MM: What do you love most about aesthetics?

TR: I love that it's an area of medicine that can be looked at two ways. It can be looked at as superficial, and it can be looked at as people want to stay youthful and invest in looking healthy. And if we're able to provide such services with quality care and make a person feel better about themselves, that's what inspires me. And that's what makes me feel good about wanting to run a successful operation.

MM: What do you love most about being an entrepreneur?

TR: I love that I can make an impact. I spent 20 years in corporate, and I think it's the ability to make change and to make a difference. I'm humbled that I've had an opportunity to be in corporate, and I've had an opportunity to run a practice and have a case study that's successful, and now I want to be able to give back the things that I've learned and the successes I've had to other practices.

MM: What advice would you give to med spa owners?

TR: I would say that if you don't know something, it's imperative that you ask or seek professionals to help you so you are not making costly mistakes, and do not try to pinch pennies. And you really need to have the proper infrastructure and the proper team in place to have a successful business and to be different and stand out.

MM: What was the goal of the design that you chose?

TR: I think Beverly Hills is the Mecca of beauty, so it's very contemporary. It's very white, very open, very airy. People who are spending their own disposable income don't want to come and have it feel like a doctor's office, so it's very warm. It's very warm and welcoming—not cold. I think it’s important to have a place where they feel very comfortable and that’s aesthetically pleasing since, this is the environment that we're in.

MM: What was your inspiration for that design?

TR: I don't know that I had an inspiration. I hired a phenomenal designer and I had been around other practices to see what that was all about. The inspiration was to make people feel like they’re walking into this warm and inviting place, but yet kind of having that feeling of, “Wow,” right? This is a really, really well-designed, beautiful place. It makes them feel like that's going to equate to the kind of service that we provide.

AmSpa members receive QP every quarter. Click here to learn how to become a member and make your med spa the next aesthetic success story.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  QP 

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Building a Marketing Program

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 28, 2019

marketing meeting

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

As the number of new medical aesthetic offices is steadily increasing, it is essential that you build and sustain an effective marketing program. The goal of this program is simple and two-fold:

  1. Attract new patients; and 
  2. Retain current patients.

To achieve this goal, you first need to establish your presence in the market. This can be achieved by branding your office, services and programs, and by creating and sustaining a successful marketing outreach plan. Both a strong physical presence and a successful media presence are critical components of this plan.

Once you have attracted the attention of a prospective patient, your job is to communicate your expertise. Because the front office staff often is a patient’s first contact with the office, it is critical that members of your staff are knowledgeable and engaging. They inform potential patients of the technology, treatments and individualized programs your office offers. Click here to read about the LAER model I developed for training front office staff.

As you implement new marketing strategies, keep track of the numbers—find out how patients first heard about your office—which marketing materials worked—and why they return (e.g. state-of-the-art technology). Know your marketing return on investment (ROI) and incorporate the most successful strategies into your business plan moving forward.

Here are some ways you can build an effective marketing program in the medical aesthetic office world.

Define Your Target Population

The first step in building an effective marketing program is to define and characterize your target patient population. You don’t necessarily want or need to attract everyone to your office—you only need to attract a certain population well. What type of clientele do you want to attract? What services are they looking for? You’ll need to know where these patients live, what services they have access to and how regularly they will visit your office. Once you have defined this population, create your marketing program to target them. Find your patient niche and commit to it.

Establish Your Presence in the Market

Physical: The physical structure of your office—both the exterior and interior—helps to define your presence in the market. An ideal location, updated sign and well-groomed exterior will attract the interest of potential patients and keep current patients returning. The interior of the office is equally, if not more important. Invest in well-appointed furniture and décor. The main waiting room and each treatment room should be clean, inviting and well-decorated. Offer pamphlets and relevant literature on the treatments you provide so patients are informed of your services in advance of their appointment. You also may want to offer refreshments and/or a hot beverage station to make patients feel more comfortable as they wait.

Media: The most successful medical aesthetic offices market themselves through a variety of media. Create brief and targeted marketing advertisements and publish them where your target patient population will see them. Consider local and regional magazines and newsletters. In the current day and age, it also is essential to create and maintain a positive presence on social media, whether through Facebook, Instagram or a similar avenue. Keep in mind that building your social media presence takes time. You won’t see an immediate return on your investment, but with careful branding, engaging posts and consistency, you will build a successful, long-lasting presence.

Communicate Your Expertise

Communicating your expertise goes hand in hand with establishing your presence in the market. It’s important to clearly communicate the services and treatments you offer, as well as how your office excels over the competition. Do you offer state-of-the-art technology? Individualized treatment plans? Top-notch staff? Market this to prospective patients. You can do this in a variety of ways, including quarterly newsletters, professional pamphlets, informational booths at conferences and more. You also can host informational sessions at your office annually or biannually. This gives you a chance to connect with your patients and present information about existing or new treatments or services in your office.

Targeted e-mails are key components of communicating your expertise. Make sure you have current and prospective patient emails, and send them personalized information monthly or quarterly. The key here is personalization, reach and frequency. You want to make your patients feel important. Send out any new information regarding technology and/or treatments they previously have received or expressed interest in.

Keep Track of the Numbers

There are several important numbers you need to know to track the progress of your marketing program. Know your marketing ROI—the projected and actual ROI for each marketing avenue (social media, e-mail promotions, informational sessions, etc.) and track them quarterly. You’ll want to invest more money and/or personnel in the marketing programs that are working and find ways to improve the programs that aren’t. It also is important to know your current patient conversion and patient retention rates. How many prospective patients come in for their first consultation appointment? How many current patients are satisfied with their experience and return? These rates are directly tied to the success of your marketing program.

Plan for the Future

Implement an informed and guided plan for the future. Assess the numbers and consider patient feedback. Have your patient conversion rates increased due to a positive, established social media platform? Do your patients give positive feedback—verbal or written—on quarterly newsletters and individualized emails? Make concrete goals for the future and implement strategies and procedures to get there. If your goal is to increase patient conversion by 50%, invest in training your front office staff and developing the right materials to educate prospective patients on the high-quality service and care you provide. This will lead to increased consultation and service appointments in the future, expanding your patient base and increasing the profitability and success of your office.

Click here to learn more about training with Terri Ross.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical, a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Guest Post  Med Spa Trends 

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QP Extra: Q&A with David Prokupek of Ideal Image MedSpa

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 23, 2019

david prokupek

Prior to the economic downturn of 2008, medical aesthetic franchises were common; however, ever since the Great Recession, the industry has been dominated by independent practices. Today, large chains are beginning to re-emerge, led by Ideal Image MedSpa, a Tampa, Florida-based company that boasts 137 locations in the United States and Canada. AmSpa Content Writer/Editor Michael Meyer recently spoke with Ideal Image CEO David Prokupek about the company’s ability to offer patients convenience and high-quality care.

Michael Meyer: How did you first get into the medical aesthetic business?

David Prokupek: I got into medical aesthetics in a couple of ways. My brother is a doctor out in Los Angeles, and he's a little bit in this business; I was helping him look at the category. And then I got a call from the L Catterton guys, our private equity firm, who I'd known for the last 15 years, and they told me about this great opportunity and investment that they had in Ideal Image. Over about a 60- to 90-day period, I looked at the business and finished out all the industry work, and here I am.

MM: What would you say is the most important factor to your success as a company?

DP: There are a number of factors to our success, but one of the main ones is that the leadership position that we hold in the industry gives us a tremendous amount of resources to really provide every client with a team of medical experts, and skin, face and body specialists. It's a unique position in the industry. A lot of people are very curious about how this noninvasive world works, so we're able to give them a counselor to help guide them through that and a medical professional, nurses and the like to do the treatments. That's been a big part of our secret sauce. Our consumers and clients really like the fact that we are a one-stop shop for everything—skin, face and body. We’re doing a tremendous amount of injectables, laser hair removal and body-sculpting. And we’re surprisingly affordable. Our average client is an average American, and we’ve figured out through our scale how to make the services surprisingly affordable. That’s added up to a lot of success for us.

MM: What makes your med spa different from others?

DP: I do think that our medically driven model is different. We are very much on trend about what's working and evaluating a lot of new services that are in the marketplace. And convenience has become an increasingly important part of our success. This last year, we've gone to same-day treatments for Botox and injectables, and almost half our business is happening that way right now. We're open late in the evening. And we've just put in all these 3-D skin Reveal cameras to really start to provide personalized analysis, especially around the face and skin. I think people really appreciate that personalized approach to the business.

MM: What is your most popular treatment? Which one brings in the most revenue?

DP: It's been changing. This past year, from a popularity perspective, Botox, facial fillers and injectables have become among the most popular things that we do. That business has been more than doubling this last year, and is really fueled by a broad interest from young women in their twenties to folks my vintage. There is a high, high level of interest amongst Americans as to what role injectables can play.

In terms of total revenue, our laser hair business still brings in the most money every year, but it's getting very balanced across body-contouring, injectables and laser hair at this point.

MM: What specific metrics do you use to determine success?

DP: As a leader of business of our size, I look at a balanced scorecard in terms of measuring our business. We spend a lot of time on consumer metrics, around net promoter score, satisfaction and ratings, as well as people's likelihood to recommend us. I look a lot at what our traffic looks like, from new clients to existing clients coming in and their purchase patterns with us. I think it's important for us to build a balanced approach to the business, so I’m really focused on the growth in the various modalities, including laser, hair, injectables, skin resurfacing and the like. The last thing is around our people, in terms of tenure and productivity and those kinds of metrics.

MM: What do you love most about aesthetics?

DP: I love that we really can help people look and feel their best naturally. People just feel good after they leave one of their clinics, and it's just a really uplifting industry to be in.

MM: What do you love most about being an entrepreneur?

DP: It really lets you create a platform to be transformational, to take risks and to try new things without a lot of constraints. That's really played to my skillset. I think, personally and professionally, it's very rewarding to be able to try those new things and be very creative. My style of being an entrepreneur has been to partner with private equity firms—in this case, L Catterton, the leading consumer private equity group. It helps me get the best consumer thinking and capital to be able to grow, and it's really energizing.

MM: What advice would you give to other med spa owners?

DP: I think it's really important, as an industry, that we really are transparent to what the client wants and needs regarding how our services work, and that we listen. I think it's really important that we focus on delivering results that are natural. And I think, personally, that focusing on the consumer, around convenience and service hours and services, is really something that's going to be important as the med spa category takes market share from other traditional places. I think if we focus broadly as an industry on those things, we're going to all do very well.

ideal image

MM: What is the goal with the clinic design that you incorporate into your facilities?

DP: We're continually working on our design, but I think one of the most important aspects of our design is to be warm and to be welcoming. I think that's critical. But patients should also have a sense of privacy. More and more people are talking about the procedures they're having, but there's also still an innate sense of privacy, confidence and intimacy that people want to have. The design, both in the consultation rooms and the treatment rooms, needs to be set up well for that. I would also say location—we’re trying to be more ‘Main on Main’ and in the flow of where our consumers live and work every day, versus being hidden away, and build the brand through visibility and convenience.

MM: What do you think is the benefit of your many locations? How does that affect your business?

DP: We have the benefit of having about 140 locations in a lot of states and in Canada. I think there are a couple of things that gets us. In terms of purchasing scale, we're almost everyone's biggest customer in the aesthetics business. It affords us a level of scale that we get to pass onto the consumer. One of the reasons I stepped into this role is that I really believe that building and having a brand that people see in the neighborhood around the United States inspires confidence. I think that gives us a lot of benefit to customers who start their treatments at one clinic and ultimately transfer to others along the way. I believe that as the leader with the locations, we have the ability to help set the standard for what a great business model from a consumer perspective and business model can look like, and that scale is going to bear fruit for us.

AmSpa members receive QP every quarter. Click here to learn how to become a member and make your med spa the next aesthetic success story.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  QP 

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QP Extra: Q&A with Marria Pooya of Greenwich Medical Spa

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 16, 2019

marria pooya

After having her second child, Marria Pooya contemplated becoming a full-time mom, but the former Wall Street financial analyst couldn’t resist the call of entrepreneurship and set out in search of new opportunities. In 2005, she founded Greenwich Medical Spa in Riverside, Connecticut; today, the practice has three locations and is thriving, thanks in large part to Pooya’s drive to succeed. Pooya recently spoke with AmSpa Content Writer/Editor Michael Meyer about her journey through the world of medical aesthetics.

Michael Meyer: What inspired you to open your practice?

Marria Pooya: My background is Wall Street. I was a financial analyst covering the high-yield sector companies like consumer products and retail chains. I did that for about three years, and then I worked for a consumer products company where I helped develop two color cosmetic lines that were sold in mass retail stores like CVS and Rite Aid. When we had our second child, I actually wanted to be a stay-at-home mom. It didn't really last long.

Six months later, I got the itch to open another business. I actually wanted to open a candy store—something like Dylan's—and my husband said, “Why don't you just go online and see if there are any franchises out there?” And when I did, that's when I learned about the med spa business, because there are a couple of franchises out there, and I knew that that's what I wanted to do. I love the beauty business, so I felt like that was my calling.

The next thing we know, we're on a plane to Arizona to buy a med spa franchise. They had the sexy story—baby boomers getting older, they have disposable income, they want to look younger and they don't want to have surgery. So, $80,000 later, we come back and we have a franchise, but we found that that the franchise was actually a sham. They had the sexy story but not the experience to carry out the vision. So we sued the franchisor, got out of our franchise agreement and then changed our name to Greenwich Medical Spa.

MM: What's different about your practice now versus when you opened?

MP: Well, when we first opened we were only four people, and now we're, like, 25. That's the main difference. But also, when we first opened, it was very different. You didn't have a lot of the non-surgical technologies that we have today, in terms of what we could provide to our patients at that time. You had Botox, fillers, laser hair removal and an IPL machine, and that's it. That was the technology 14 years ago.

Now there are so many different modalities for non-surgical treatments, from skin tightening to non-surgical fat reduction, like CoolSculpting, to now threads for lifting the skin. This industry has really dramatically increased, maybe twofold or now threefold, so there are more options for the patients. That's the main difference.

Also, people are more accepting of injectables, like Botox. Fourteen years ago, nobody talked about Botox, and when somebody had it done, they didn't tell their friends. Nowadays, it's a lot more common and acceptable.

MM: What's one word you would use to describe your med spa journey?

MP: Probably “growth.” Coming from Wall Street, I didn't have the experience to manage a staff. I think that for myself, a lot of growth has happened in the past 14 years. I've become a better manager. When I was working on Wall Street, the philosophy was that you pay people well and you expect them to do the job, and that's it. That's all it was. It wasn't about encouraging the staff members, saying a “thank you” or “please,” or helping them develop. Over time, I’ve become a better listener, a better manager, and I've learned a lot.

MM: What is your most popular treatment?

MP: Hands down the injectables. Botox is a big part of our business. People come in for that, and then we're able to up-sell them to other treatments. It's a treatment that is well-known in the population, because it's advertised a lot and people are talking about it. It's a great treatment. Botox is about 22% of our business, and injectables are 39%.

MM: What's the most important factor in your success?

MP: I think that the most important thing is your employees. It's really important that we have the best customer service for our patients, and that starts with our employees. It starts from the front staff to the mid-levels who actually are providing the treatments to the back office, who are helping support both the front and the back. The staff can make you or break you. It's how they treat the clients and if they believe in your vision. It's the welcoming tone that they have on the phone. It's the person who's doing the treatment and who actually cares about the patient and listens to them—truly listens to them—and tries to become a partner with them in their journey of rejuvenation. Employees are really, really important, and it's been a huge learning experience for me since opening the business.

In the beginning when I had opened the business, we were going through a lot of turnover where I didn't know how to manage my staff. I wasn't a good manager—I wasn't a good leader. We were just hiring people to fill in positions. Now we're actually going through a process—we're hiring the right fit, people who actually believe in our vision, believe in what they do and love what they do. The fit is really important with us. One of the reasons why we've been successful is we have a team that works really, really well together. They love coming to the business. They look at it as if it's their own business. They feel invested in it, and that translates into happy clients who leave here, leave great reviews and love coming back.

MM: What would you say makes your med spa different than others?

MP: I think that it starts with the customer experience. Let me just take you through the journey. Say that we get a lead that comes in an email. The first thing we do is call the patient up immediately and try to get them to come in for an appointment. Before they even come into an appointment, we send them a video describing what they should expect during their consultation. When they come in, the person gets up, already knows the patient's name, greets them, brings them in and then hands them off to the clinician who does the treatment. When the patient leaves, we send them a handwritten thank-you letter as well as their treatment protocol, and then we call them back after the consultation to see if they have any questions; we also do that for follow-up visits. After every treatment that we do, somebody calls the patient and asks if they had a great experience and if they had any questions. I don't believe anybody else does that. It's that kind of experience that we give to our patients that sets us apart from everybody else.

Besides that, though, we have an amazing reputation in the community because we've worked really, really hard to get some of these accolades. For example, we are the number-one provider of Botox and CoolSculpting in Connecticut, and also in Westchester County, New York, and we're top-100 out of 20,000 locations, and that's because of the volume of these treatments that we offer. We have a reputation in the market that we give great customer service, we give great outcomes for our patients, they're happy with their results and they're willing to come back.

greenwich medical spa

MM: Who inspires you?

MP: My husband. He works behind the scenes and is a huge support system for me. He's always given me great advice. He tells me to calm down when I'm anxious and nervous. He's been a really great motivator. I guess that's another reason that I'm successful. Also, I feel that your employees can make you or break you, so having great employees who are happy also tells me that I'm successful.

MM: What do you love most about aesthetics?

MP: I love the confidence that it gives people. Just a little bit of enhancement—a little bit of Botox in the forehead lines and removing those lines—can make somebody feel so much better about themselves. Just coming in here and talking to somebody, and they tell you, “You know what? You don't need anything,” they leave feeling better. That's great. That's what I love. It's the confidence that this business gives to people. I love that. I love making people feel good about who they are every single day.

MM: What do you love about being an entrepreneur?

MP: I love the challenge. My father is an entrepreneur and it's in my blood. I love the fact that it's something that is hard to do. The statistic is, I think, 90% of the businesses fail within three years, so we would sit there and say, “Okay, we need to make the three-year mark.” And then once we hit three years, then it was like, if you make it to five years, you have an 80% chance of surviving and doing well. When we hit the five year mark, we're like, “Okay, we're safe.” And then 10 years was like, “Okay, now you've made it.” What I love about being an entrepreneur is that challenge of every day waking up and trying to find out, can we make this business successful? Can we drive this? Can we get this to the next level? That's what I love about it.

Also, when you're an entrepreneur and you're a decision-maker, you can make changes really, really quickly versus a corporate business. If you, for example, come up with a marketing idea, you could implement that within a day, whereas when you are working for a corporation, it takes months to do that same thing. For example, if you want to introduce a new technology or a new service, when you're an entrepreneur or a startup, you can just go in and take the dive—do your research and do that. However, if you are a chain or if you are in a corporate world, you have to go through these processes and systems to make sure that this is what you need to do. That's why I love it—you can implement something really quickly or take something out of your business really quickly versus being working for a corporation. I love that.

MM: What advice would you give to other med spa owners?

MP: I think that customer service is really important. What will set you apart from your competition? Will it be the customer experience? And that starts with your employees. So, it's really important that you make sure that you have the right fit and invest in your employees—pay for education and training, pay them above-market, and make them feel that they're really part of the business.

Also, when you're starting out, it's really important that you focus on your margins and keep your overhead low. Maybe start out hiring part-time positions. For example, when I started my business, besides my spa coordinator, everybody was part-time—my aestheticians and my mid-levels. This way, I save on paying benefits such as medical insurance, 401k and PTO. Also, when you're scheduling your treatments when you're starting out, work three to four days out of the week instead of five to six days. When I started out, we were open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and then we added Friday and Wednesday as we got busier. When people asked on a day that we didn't have staff, we just said that we're fully booked. Really think about the bottom line and try to focus on your financials, because this industry is such a high overhead business.

AmSpa members receive QP every quarter. Click here to learn how to become a member and make your med spa the next aesthetic success story.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Trends  QP 

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Should Your Medical Spa Tell Yelp to Buzz Off?

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 15, 2019

negative reviews

By Jeff Segal, MD, JD, ByrdAdatto and Medical Justice

Have you heard of Botto Bistro? It’s a pizzeria in the Bay Area. Chef Davide Cerrentini, who emigrated to the US in the ‘90s, opened the restaurant’s doors in 2009.

Cerrentini is famous for asking happy diners to give him a one-star Yelp review. That’s right—one star.

Botto Bistro has accrued thousands of these reviews, and was at one time ranked as the worst-rated restaurant on Yelp. To Cerrentini, that was a badge of honor.

By the way, he is immensely successful.

Here’s what happened, and why Cerrentini embraced the lowest of the low reviews.

Shortly after the restaurant opened, he received calls from Yelp salespeople. They suggested he buy ads on Yelp. When he told the salespeople, “No thanks,” he observed that some recent five-star reviews had disappeared.

“I came from Italy, and know exactly what mafia extortion looks like,” he said. “Yelp was manipulating reviews and hoping I would pay a protection fee. I didn’t come to America and work for 25 years to be extorted by some idiot in Silicon Valley.”

Cerrentini then turned to the dark side. He wrote his own five-star reviews to replace the real ones that were removed. He also wrote negative reviews of neighboring restaurants.

Ultimately, he gave in. He started spending $270 per month to advertise on Yelp.

After six months, he pulled the plug. He found the service “useless” and cancelled his advertising. Then, his star rating dropped.

In the spring of 2014, after turning down another Yelp salesperson, Cerretini claims that four five-star reviews were filtered from his page, and three one-star reviews were suddenly catapulted to the top of the page. For the chef, this was the final straw.

“What if I don’t give a s*** about reputation?” he said. “What if I take away their power by actually making it worse?”

One morning in September 2014, he placed a simple sign in front of Botto Bistro: “Give us a one-star review on Yelp and get 25% off any pizza! Hate us on Yelp.” (The discount was later increased to 50%.)

The next day, business exploded. Cerretini was making money hand over fist. Botto Bistro quickly had more than 2,000 reviews. Most of the ratings praised the food and the service, and then gave it one star.

“Botto Bistro sucks,” wrote one reviewer. “Delicious food priced fairly. One star.”

“Seriously, who puts meat on pizza?”

“Don’t try the pizza, it’s so good you will come back every night, it completely ruined my social life cause each night I only want to go there. I hate this place.”

“I ordered meatballs and they were served upside down.”

A Yelp support member sent Cerrentini an email chiding him for offering incentives in exchange for a review. That was a violation of Yelp’s terms of service. Hmm.

Other business owners have followed Cerrentini’s lead. Some have posed “No Yelpers” signs in their windows.

A new documentary called Billion Dollar Bully catalogues the Yelp controversy. Click here to check out the trailer.

Cerrentini has been very successful with his high-risk gambit. It took a lot of guts.

“Most people are not ready to stop caring about reviews—it’s a big risk,” he said. “But I’d rather sit alone in my restaurant then get business from Yelpers.”

What do you think? Particularly related to Yelp in the health care space?

We understand the temptation to ignore outlets like Yelp is strong, but we urge doctors to resist the urge. By ignoring a problem post on Yelp, you are denying patients access to a counter-narrative. And if there is no counter-narrative, there’s an increased risk the doctor will be defined by that problem post.

This is a bad outcome—patients prematurely reject doctors who are qualified to treat them, and doctors miss the opportunity to treat patients.

So what’s the remedy? We advise doctors take a proactive approach. Before you get blasted online, populate the internet with accurate descriptions of your quality of care. In this way, when the inevitable happens, you have a defense against the angry, the uninformed and the malevolent.

Medical Justice has designed a program that addresses these obstacles. The program exists for two reasons—the first is to keep your online reputation out of the crosshairs, and the second is to help new patients find you.

Jeffrey J. Segal, MD, JD, is a neurosurgeon turned serial entrepreneur turned attorney at ByrdAdatto who has literally been in both business and medicine. Segal was a neurosurgeon in private practice before beginning the second phase of his career as a serial entrepreneur in the health care field. He then founded or co-founded four separate health care startups. Segal lives and breathes health care and understands it viscerally.

Tags:  Business and Financials  ByrdAdatto  Med Spa Law 

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How to Stand Out in the World of Medical Aesthetic Offices

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 14, 2019

medical spa treatment

By Terri Ross, Terri Ross Consulting

When I first started my business, I was well aware of the positive impact I would make; however, the outcomes have far exceeded my expectations. Providing growth strategies is my passion, and I want you to dive into reading some of the ways I’ve helped businesses get to where they are today. This is for business owners who want to make their businesses stand out and shine, and want to stay ahead of the industry.

In this post, I will take you through some of the criteria that every practice needs to consider when entering the aesthetic market, and continue to monitor and evaluate for continuous success.

In the world of medical aesthetic offices, competition is fierce—and steadily increasing. In order to succeed and stand out against the sea of competitors, your office must exceed expectations. This means every aspect of your office—from the infrastructure, processes, systems and staff to location and marketing strategies—must be carefully planned out and executed. Knowing where you are by the numbers is one critical part of managing growth and optimizing your processes. Read more about key numbers you should know here.

A knowledgeable and engaging front office staff, informed marketing strategies, state-of-the-art technology, trained clinical providers who are able to perform a successful patient consultation, and, more importantly, systems and processes are all integral parts of a top performing medical office. In my eight years of experience transforming new or average-performing medical aesthetic offices into top-performing practices, I’ve developed a list of six key components that differentiate highly successful medical spas or practices.

Well-Trained Front-Office Staff

Your front-office staff is the face of your office. It is critical that all members of the front office are well trained, knowledgeable, informed and engaging.

The job of the front-office staff is two-fold:

  • To engage, listen and inform prospective patients of the high-quality care your office offers; and
  • To continue to offer the highest quality of service to current patients, which relates directly to your patient retention.

When a prospective patient calls your office, the front office staff must quickly and effectively convey the message that your office offers the highest-quality care, technology and expertise in the market. Therefore, it is critical that all members of your staff are knowledgeable—that they know the details of every procedure and treatment you offer. Further, it is imperative that they know how the treatments and services offered in your office compare to those of competitors and are able to relay that information clearly and concisely to potential patients. By listening, engaging and responding, your front-office staff will consistently convert prospective patients into long-term patients and ensure current patients are satisfied and return. Click here to read more about the LAER model I developed for effectively training your front-office staff.

Passion

To start and maintain a top-performing office, you will undoubtedly need passion for patient care and business. Aside from developing the initial expertise required to start your office, you will need to stay informed about and ahead of new technologies, and successfully incorporate these into your practice on a regular basis. This takes passion and drive. Also, you’ll need passion for business. Know your office by the numbers: potential ROI on equipment and marketing strategies, new patient rates and room revenue assumptions, to name a few. Read more about critical numbers you should know here.

Plan for the future. Consistently and creatively think of new ways to expand your business and implement the necessary changes for future growth. New marketing strategies, processes and protocols, as well as staff training are included in a comprehensive plan for office growth and optimization. To lead both the medical and business sides of your office, you certainly will need passion and a keen sense of determination.

Marketing Strategies

Marketing strategies are critical in the world of medical aesthetic offices. You need to stand out among the sea of competitors, and the most direct way to do this is to be known. Make sure potential patients know you exist. And, further, make sure they know key elements that make your office unique: state-of-the-art equipment, the highest quality of service, personalized treatment plans, etc. In other words, brand your office.

Making specific goals and implementing strategies to get there are other important aspects of effective marketing. If your goal is to increase new patient leads by 50%, implement fresh and innovative advertising and/or offer new promotions to attract potential patients. Measure your progress and keep track of your marketing ROI. Read more about how to build a successful marketing plan in this article from the Huffington Post.

Location

Choosing the right location for your medical aesthetic office is key. The right location takes a number of factors into consideration:

  • Where your prospective patients live, accessibility and convenience;
  • If your office is centrally located and convenient to a broad base of customers;
  • Your office’s visibility; and
  • Your office, the physical structure, the sign and the parking lot are central parts of your marketing strategy.

A well-located office attracts new patients and helps to ensure current patients return.

State-of-the-Art Technology

Treatment and procedure options in the world of medical aesthetic offices are constantly evolving, as new research emerges and new products become available. To offer the best possible service to your patients, you will need the best tools. This means that in addition to staying on top of emerging research trends, you will need to assess, budget for and acquire new equipment for your office.

This requires careful research and calculations:

  • Initial cost, maintenance costs, training and treatment pricing all go into calculating the potential ROI for a new piece of equipment; and
  • Consider your competitors when choosing which equipment to acquire. Do you offer new and/or different technology compared to your top competitors? How will you differentiate your office?

New technology goes hand inhand with staying on trend with the newest medical aesthetic treatments. You want to make sure you have the proper tools to offer the best service.

Staying On Trend

It is imperative that you stay ahead of new technologies and treatment options. This requires knowing the research and implementing changes ahead of time to acquire new equipment and the expertise to use it. This also requires that your office staff and clinical medical providers are continually learning the technology and portraying this information clearly to prospective patients. In this industry, prospective patients often know what they want, and they are seeking out the right office to offer that service. Make sure your staff is informed and knowledgeable of the technology you offer. State-of-the-art technology, a well trained staff and creative marketing strategies will ensure that you consistently land and retain patients seeking the newest available procedures.

In conclusion, comprehensive and consistent setup of your practice requires constant fine-tuning, and it is helpful to engage the help of a professional who can look at your practice with fresh eyes. As a busy doctor or business owner, your focus is on treating your patients, but the same care is required to build the business.

Click here to learn more about training with Terri Ross.

Terri Ross brings more than 20 years of sales and management experience to the field, having worked with leading-edge medical device companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, Merck Schering Plough and Indigo Medical; a surgical division of Johnson.

Ross’ vast knowledge and experience as a sales director managing upwards of $20M in revenue and successful teams has allowed her to become a renowned plastic surgery management consultant helping aesthetic practices thrive.

To optimize revenues and business performance, Ross’ practice management consulting services help physicians evaluate practice processes including, but not limited to, overall-operating efficiencies, staff skill assessment, customer service and operating efficiency strategies. The goal is to develop a comprehensive plan of action to improve productivity, quality, efficiency and return on investment.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Guest Post  Med Spa Trends 

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How to Choose the Right Aesthetic Partner

Posted By Administration, Monday, August 12, 2019

handshake

By Cynosure

Are you ready to get into aesthetics, but are struggling to choose the right company? Ensure that you’re partnering with a company that is truly invested in your success by asking yourself:

  • Are they driving quality client leads to your practice and helping you convert leads to consultations? A vendor should make it a point to help you drive leads by having your business appear at the top of search results across the web and on social channels while also making it easy for patients to book appointments.
  • Do they offer services that provide 24/7 access to branded marketing materials for your practice? Look for vendors that provide quality marketing materials that remain fresh and help you successfully market treatments to patients.
  • Will you have marketing specialists dedicated to helping your practice thrive? Will they offer guidance on handling client objections? A vendor should make it a priority to provide marketing guidance and support, as well as assist with handling client objections. Look for vendors that have marketing specialists specific to your business who are available to assist you whenever you need it.

Cynosure offers quality technology with a comprehensive product portfolio and practice support team to ensure user success. It is partnering with AmSpa to provide exclusive access to discounts on capital equipment that drives revenue and results to users’ business.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Guest Post  Med Spa Trends 

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