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Long-Term Medical Spa Market Research: Generation Z

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

The industry impact of Millennials as medical spa patients is just beginning to be felt, as “The Selfie Generation” currently accounts for about 20% of aesthetic patients. As this demographic ages it promises to offer a lot of potential clients as the growth of social media has led to increased comfort with the idea of medical aesthetic treatments, causing the average age of first treatments to plummet for many procedures. For all of the possibilities presented by this age group, the digital natives of Generation Z present even an greater opportunity in the long run.

Generation Z is typically defined as beginning with people born in the mid-to-late 1990s, so the oldest Zers are currently in their late teens. It may be difficult for many of us to imagine, but most of Generation Z cannot remember a time before 9/11. They grew up in a world where the U.S. has always been at war, where a crippling recession caused by corporate greed cost millions of people their jobs and livelihoods, and where deep-seated political turmoil is a fact of life. 

They’ve been raised on technology and know how to use social media more effectively than anyone else, but while Millennials are (probably unfairly) seen as being more passive and self-interested, Generation Z seems determined to fix the problems caused by those who came before. It also is worth pointing out that Generation Z is a larger group than the Millennials.

Of course, it also should be noted that they also have very short attention spans, and their independent mind-sets can sometimes lead to problems, but these quirks are part of the package and, sooner or later, everyone is going to need to learn how to deal with it.

In the context of the medical aesthetic industry—and every other business, quite frankly—it is important to learn what matters to Generation Zers. Today, the majority of marketing is still directed at Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials, and for good reason, since these groups are the ones that are earning (or have earned) money to spend. But in the very near future, Generation Z is going to be flexing its financial muscle and, when it does, it’s going to make an enormous impact on the economy.  Therefore, it is up to businesspeople to do whatever they can to find out how best to market to Zers.

Unfortunately, that information isn’t necessarily available yet, since Generation Z is only now beginning to enter the workforce en masse, but medical spa owners and operators should at the very least be aware of the seismic shift that may be on the way and do whatever they can to keep track of emerging trends in Gen Z business. AmSpa will of course be following this story from a medical aesthetic perspective, and you should check out publications such as Inc to learn about broader business trends.

Businesspeople underestimate these young people at their peril, so be sure to learn all you can about them.

Tags:  Med Spa Trends 

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Medical Spa Insider: Terri Wojak on Her Career in Aesthetics, Advocacy, and Working with Plastic Surgeon Steven Dayan

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 1, 2018

 

AmSpa Founder/Director Alex Thiersch and Director of Operations Cathy Christensen sit down with their long-time friend Terri Wojak, LE/President of True U Education.

They discuss her book, Aesthetics Exposed (with an update on the horizon!), her career in aesthetics, her work advocating for aestheticians, working with world-famous plastic surgeon Steven Dayan, and more!

Terri Wojak will also be presenting on selecting the right treatments for your med spa at the Rosemont Boot Camp next weekend, March 10th-11th. Register here! 

Tags:  Medical Spa Insider Podcast 

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Letter From the Director: Thank You!

Posted By Aly Boeckh, Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Alex Thiersch here, director of AmSpa. I’m back from AmSpa’s first ever Medical Spa Show and, after sleeping for 3 days straight, I wanted to reach out to all of you and say THANK YOU to each of you who attended. The turnout and feedback we received was absolutely overwhelming and I couldn’t be prouder of everyone who turned up to show their support. Anyone who was there can attest to the fact that the energy at the meeting was palpable. And the most exciting thing to me wasn’t the speakers (which were incredible), the diverse and engaged exhibitors (all of whom brought their A game), or even the absolutely incredible facility (Aria has to be one of the coolest resorts in the US). 


No, the thing I was most proud of was you, the attendees. How incredible was it to FINALLY get everyone in the industry together, in one place, for an event that was dedicate solely to med spas? We had nearly 250 med spas represented from all over the country (even Canada, Chile and Africa!), from all different walks of life, representing an incredible array of innovation, technology, grit, and entrepreneurship. And again…the energy, the excitement about the future, and the goodwill of all who were there was truly overwhelming. I’ve been to many conferences, and I have to tell you I have never experienced a group of people so engaged with one another, so excited to be part of something, but most of all, so nice. This industry is on rocket fuel right now, and so long as all of you continue to pour your heart and soul into growing into a profitable, safe, compliant industry, I promise that we at AmSpa will put all of our resources to bear to support each and every one o f you. I couldn’t be prouder to be a part of it, so thank you, each of you, for your participation in the meeting.

I did want to plug our Boot Camps since many of you have asked about them. For those of you who haven’t been, AmSpa has been putting on Medical Spa and Aesthetic Bootcamps for three years now. These are different from the Medical Spa Show in that they are two days of extended, intense training in an MBA-style format. We limit the number of attendees and offer extended periods for our speakers to teach – 60 to 90 minute sessions, minimum. Many of the incredible speakers you saw at the show are there to teach you everything they know about how to run a profitable aesthetic practice. Regardless of whether you are open, getting ready to open, or just thinking about opening, I can’t recommend enough coming to a Boot Camp. But beware – it’s an intense two days, and you will leave absolutely exhausted, filled with information, but incredibly pumped up to move forward. And if anyone has any doubts, we are more than happy to refer you to over 300 satisfied customers who have attended, any one of whom will be happy to discuss their experience. 

We’re kicking off our Boot Camp season in Rosemont on March 10-11 (this is the city that O’Hare Airport is located in Chicago, so it’s super easy for anyone in the country to get to … it’s being held at the Hilton Rosemont, which even offers a shuttle to and from the airport), and have six other dates planned. With our increased membership and the attendance at the Medical Spa Show, these dates are already filling up and they will sell out. So check your calendar and sign up right away because we don’t want anyone to miss out!

Thanks again to all of you, and we look forward to a strong and successful 2018!

Tags:  AmSpa's Med Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps 

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The Value of No

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 15, 2018

 

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

When you visit a grocery store and peruse the cookie aisle, you might be surprised to find that where there used to be just a few varieties of Oreo cookies, there are now several, including some that seem somewhat bizarre. (Swedish Fish Oreos, anyone?) Similarly, a stroll to the liquor department reveals a wide variety of flavored vodka, whereas previously the only flavor of vodka was… well, vodka. Finally, when you look at the candy at the checkout counter, you’ll find that among the tried and true chocolate bars and fruit chews, there are at least a few new selections that you’ve never seen before, and chances are they’re produced by established companies.

For enormous multinational corporations like the ones that manufacture these products, it’s understood that more is more. With Oreo, for example, as long as its classic chocolate and vanilla crème sandwich cookies continue to sell, the company will be fine, and it can afford to say yes to strange limited-run flavors such as Peeps Oreos. But most companies are not in this position, so business owners—including medical spa owners and operators—need to understand the value of saying no.

People are taught that being adventurous is a good thing—that if you say yes to every opportunity presented to you, you’ll live a fuller, more audacious life. In business, however, this can be a risky tactic. The Harvard Business Review website recently posted an article titled “The Art of Strategy Is About Knowing When to Say No,” by HubSpot co-founder and CEO Brian Halligan, that illustrates the circumstances under which conscientious businesspeople should consider saying no to an idea that is presented to them, even if it seems like a good one. This is excellent advice for those in the field of medical aesthetics.

Consider this: If your medical spa is making good money with injectibles, it might seem like a natural next step to buy a CoolSculpting machine or two and expand your menu. But unlike Oreo, a medical spa has a finite amount of resources, and unless you know your market is teeming with people who want CoolSculpting and can’t get it anywhere else, you’re taking a major risk by diverting employees and marketing capital from a successful area of your business to something that, while potentially lucrative, is totally unproven.

This might seem antithetical to the common idea that a business should always be looking to expand, but in reality, there’s nothing at all wrong with passing on an opportunity like the one mentioned above, particularly when you’re trying to gain market share. You need to understand what you want to achieve with your business and stay focused on that instead of altering your vision every time a bright, shiny new opportunity comes your way. If buying a CoolSculpting machine and expanding your menu fits into your business plan, then by all means, go for it. But if you feel the risk outweighs the potential reward, there’s nothing at all wrong with saying no.

If you’re interesting in discussing business issues like this and many others with leading medical aesthetic industry professionals, you should definitely plan on joining AmSpa at one of our Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps this year. Click here to find out when we’re coming to a city near you and sign up to take part in this excellent educational opportunity. We hope to see you there!

Tags:  AmSpa's Med Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps 

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A Last-Minute Preview of The Medical Spa Show

Posted By Aly Boeckh, Wednesday, February 7, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

As you can imagine, we at the American Medical Spa Association are very excited about the upcoming Medical Spa Show, which we will present at the Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas from Friday, Feb. 9 to Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018. The show will offer attendees the opportunity to learn more about the industry in four concurrent educational tracks, interact with other medical spa professionals from around the country, and evaluate the wide variety of products and services presented by the top vendors in the medical spa and medical aesthetic industry. 

The educational opportunities include:

The General Session, which will provide a broad, wide-ranging overview of the medical aesthetic business, presented by successful industry professionals. Saturday morning’s sessions will all be on this track, and we recommend medical spa owners check out these sessions.

The Clinical Sessions will offer talks and demonstrations of a number of new treatments from some of the best clinicians in the industry. These sessions will provide invaluable information for a medical spa’s clinical staff members.

In Supplier Classes, attendees can hear about cutting-edge products and services directly from the suppliers themselves. If you are in search of new equipment or products that will help set your practice apart from your competition, you may very well find it here.

CEO Training, presented by Crystal Clear Digital Marketing, will be presented on Saturday afternoon and is designed to teach you how to make your practice the best it can be with advanced marketing and customer relations techniques. If you want to make sure your medical spa has the most useful exposure it possibly can, this information could be critical.

Sales and Staff Training, which is presented on Sunday, will teach your medical spa’s staff members how to more effectively sell and relate to your medical spa’s patients. This particular skill set is somewhat undervalued by medical aesthetic practices, but the ones who incorporate it effectively are models for the entire industry.

In addition, Meagan Kennedy of Fleek Brows Microblading Training, based in Orlando, Florida, will present a microblading training workshop from 8:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 9. Microblading has becoming one of the most popular treatments available in the medical aesthetic space, and if your medical spa doesn’t offer it, this seminar will help you and your employees learn how it is done and how it can benefit your clients.

And if you think this show will be all work and no play, think again. On Saturday night, AmSpa—in association with our sponsors Crystal Clear Digital Marketing and Care Credit—will present a spectacular party where you can connect with other industry professionals in a setting that only Vegas can provide. 
Enjoy dinner and passed hors d'oeuvres cooked up by the Five-Diamond kitchen at the Aria Resort & Casino!
Hit up the open bar and sip on a Doctor's Order (a custom version of the Moscow Mule served blue through an ice luge) courtesy of CareCredit!
Trade notes and stories about the show, or about the industry with professionals just like you!
Work off the day's stress on the dance floor with tunes courtesy of electric violinist and DJ Lydia Ansel! 

Happy hour begins at 6 p.m., and the party begins at 7 p.m.

And finally, we’re presenting a prize game with some fabulous giveaways, including a trip to Hawaii in conjunction with AmSpa’s 5th Anniversary Next Level Leadership Event we’ll be presenting there in June. Simply visit all our exhibitors and have them sign off on it using the Medical Spa Show app in order to qualify.

We hope to see as many of you as possible at The Medical Spa Show. This is one of the fastest-growing industries in the country, and we hope that this event will help those working in it learn how to make the most of it and have a great time in the process. We can’t wait to share this experience with you!

Tags:  The Medical Spa Show 2018 

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AmSpa Launches New Medical Aesthetic Podcast Series

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 25, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Medical spa business and legal advice and tips are things many places around the Internet claim to offer. Very few of them, however, can back up that advice with actual expert opinions. Helping medical spa owners and operators learn about the industry and improve their businesses are the primary goals of the American Medical Spa Association (AmSpa), and to that end, we’re introducing a new podcast series that is designed to both educate and entertain.

Listen to the first episode below.

Subscribe on iTunes.

This series features conversations with successful entrepreneurs in the business of aesthetics. We’ll talk to them about their experience, their stories, their backgrounds, and their success, and we’ll ask them for advice about what it takes to be successful in the business. We’re planning to have a number of well-known guests, but we’re also going to pursue interviews with businesspeople who are just getting started in the medical spa industry, as they have extremely valuable perspectives to offer as well.

However, these conversations are not going to be stuffy, all-business conversations—we want to create a more relaxed atmosphere in which we and our guests can have some fun and demonstrate our personalities. Our first episode, for example, was recorded over drinks at a bar in Dallas. We might not use this as the setting for every episode—the sound quality is less than ideal due to the background noise, for example—but I think the finished product demonstrates what a good time we had that evening and offers the sort of industry insight that you can’t get anywhere else.

The first episode features a conversation with Terri Ross, managing partner and director of Lasky Aesthetics and Laser Center in Beverly Hills, Calif. Terri’s business expertise helped to increase Lasky’s revenue by 500 percent in her first 18 months with the company, so her insight is not to be taken lightly. Terri has also worked for companies such as Zeltiq, Medicis, EMD Serono, and Johnson & Johnson, so she also possesses a breadth of knowledge that is very impressive.

AmSpa Executive Director of Operations and Communications Cathy Christensen, ByrdAdatto Partner Bradford Adatto, and I spoke with Terri about a wide range of topics, including her experience in the medical aesthetic industry, her thoughts about how to hire talented people who will continue to add value to a medical spa for years to come, the treatments that have brought her and her medical spa the most success, and management techniques that help her operate her business at peak efficiency. And on the lighter side, she relates some funny stories about her time in the industry, and I reveal myself to be an expert on scrotox.

We hope you’ll join us for this series. The first episode was a lot of fun to make, and I think you’ll enjoy it and learn something too. We will release new episodes as we make them, so the schedule may be a bit erratic, but we hope you feel that they’re worth the wait. When you see us out and about—such as at The Medical Spa Show in Las Vegas from Feb. 9 to 11—let us know what you think about the podcast and what you’d like to see from it in the future.

Sign up for AmSpa’s email newsletter
to find out when new episodes drop, and to read about industry news and updates from the American Med Spa Association.

 

 

 

Tags:  Medical Spa Insider Podcast 

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3 Tips for Opening a Medical Spa

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 18, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

There’s more to how to open a medical spa than just being an excellent medical aesthetic practitioner. Of course that is important, but there are basic business and legal compliance steps you also need to take to make sure you are successful in the long term. In 2017, we at the American Medical Spa Association (AmSpa) educated more than 300 medical aesthetic professionals on business and legal best-practices in the industry, approximately 70% of whom were just getting into non-invasive medical aesthetics.

When you’re starting out in the medical aesthetic business, it can seem like you need to learn about an overwhelming number of concepts, from effective retail strategy to regulatory compliance. Attending an AmSpa Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp can be extremely advantageous, because you can obtain a great deal of information in a short period of time. Here are previews of three very general things you need to do when you open a medical spa (you can learn more about each one at a Boot Camp near you.)

1. Draft a business plan

Business plans can be a real pain to create, but they are an important exercise. Creating a business plan requires you to think critically about details, such as: 
What your marketing strategy is going to be;
What your market is going to be;
Who your typical customers are going to be—how much do they make, are they male or female, how old are they, etc.;
Where you’re going to be located; 
What your brand is going to look like;
What the customer experience is going to be;
How much money you have;
How much money you’re going to spend;
And so forth. 
When you do this and then build it out for three to five years with a budget in a pro forma format, it gives you a good idea of how much money you’re going to need in order to actually operate your medical spa before you profit. 

For guidance, see the comprehensive medical spa business plan template available in the AmSpa store.

2. Work with an accountant or financial planner

When people start businesses, they often don’t know how to read and understand financial reports. Even I came up short in this regard when I started my first business. However, it is crucial that you learn how to do this. You need to know what a profit-and-loss statement is (a P&L), what a balance sheet is and how to make a proper budget, as well as understand what different metrics mean so that you can track your progress, make informed decisions, and plan for the future.

I tend to think that most entrepreneurs are just winging it, and sometimes that’s okay, but often it ends up leading to real disaster. Therefore, it’s vital that you get a grip on this aspect of your practice, generally by consulting with someone who has specialized training in business finance. An accountant or financial planner certainly can help with that.

3. Consult with a local health care corporate attorney

A local health care attorney will help you understand the regulatory issues facing medical spas. I am a lawyer, so you might view this as somewhat self-serving, but the truth of the matter is that medical spas are running afoul of regulatory agencies more and more, as we’ve highlighted in this space in recent weeks, so it is a very real issue. You’ll end up spending far more money fixing problems that you create by doing things incorrectly than you will if you first engage a lawyer who knows what he or she is doing.

As a rule of thumb, you should expect to spend $15,000 to $20,000 in legal and accounting fees during your medical spa’s first year in existence. That will go toward creating the company, ensuring that you’re compliant, creating contracts, creating consent forms, establishing standard operating procedures, and so forth.

You can learn more about these and many other topics at AmSpa’s Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps. Click here to learn more about how you can join us at a Boot Camp this year.

Tags:  AmSpa's Med Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps 

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The FDA and Medical Aesthetics: 2017 Regulatory Roundup

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, January 3, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

In recent months, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has begun to focus in on the medical aesthetic industry with a number of rulings on products and procedures, as well as some enforcement efforts. Here’s a quick rundown of the stories from just the past few months:


On September 15, the FDA issued a guidance document that suggested that in the near future, it will begin regulating the use of in-home microneedling devices to prevent injury to consumers.


In October, the agency raided a number of pharmacies in Florida that helped customers order relatively inexpensive prescription drugs from Canada and overseas. This may represent a reversal of a long-standing “non-enforcement” policy regarding this particular form of parallel importation. 


On November 14, the FDA warned consumers and health care practitioners about serious injuries and disfigurement that can result from the illegal use of injectable silicone or fake dermal fillers.


Also in November, the agency issued a consumer update expressing concern about stem cell treatments that are potentially harmful to patients. In it, the FDA outlines its stance on stem cell treatments and offers advice to those seeking them out.


On December 11, the FDA issued three policy papers designed to clarify its approach to the evolving oversight of digital health tools, including fitness trackers and patient support software. This is an advancement of the agency’s Digital Health Action Plan, which was introduced in the summer.

The FDA has also issued approvals for a number of products used medical esthetic treatments.


Merz North America’s Describe PFD patch was approved for use with all tattoo removal lasers; this patch is positioned over tattoos prior to laser removal, enabling multiple rapid laser passes in each treatment session. 


Aclaris Therapeutics’ Eskata (hydrogen peroxide) topical solution has been approved for the treatment of raised seborrheic keratoses


And perhaps most significantly for the medical esthetic industry, Allergan’s Botox neurotoxin has been approved for the temporary treatment of forehead lines.

Given the FDA’s recent increase in activity that could affect med spas, we feel it is important to hear directly from the agency regarding its enforcement efforts. To that end, we have booked Dr. Sangeeta Chatterjee, branch chief in the division of supply chain integrity, to speak on February 11, 2018, at The Medical Spa Show, which will take place at Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. Dr. Chatterjee’s presentation will cover:


Threats to the U.S. drug supply chain;


Public health risks and potential legal consequences associated with purchasing unapproved prescriptions drugs from unlicensed sources;


Safe purchasing practices to ensure the drugs administered to patients are safe, effective, and FDA-approved; and


How to recognize drugs that may be counterfeit or not approved by FDA.

Registration for the show is currently open; click here to learn about the various registration options for the show, see the full schedule, and find out how to reserve a room in AmSpa’s room block at the Aria. Sign up for AmSpa’s email newsletter to continue to get the latest news on medical aesthetic regulations directly to your inbox

Tags:  FDA  Med Spa Law 

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Medical Spa & Aesthetic Laws and Regulations Matter More Than Ever

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 27, 2017

 

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

 

In November 2017, Surfside, Florida, police arrested Alicia Giser, an employee at Lemel Medical Spa, who was accused of practicing medicine without a license. Working off a tip from the Florida Department of Health, Surfside and Miami-Dade County police conducted a sting operation in which Giser represented herself as a doctor and agreed to administer a Juvederm treatment to an undercover officer. Giser has claimed that she is a doctor in her native Argentina, but Florida officials assert that she is not licensed to practice medicine in the state of Florida.

 

Giser’s case is an example of the kind of thing that’s existed in the medical aesthetic industry for many years, but which regulatory agencies have typically been unable or unwilling to police. That is no longer the case, and it could signal a major change in the status quo for the future.

 

This time of year, it’s fairly common for people to ask me what trends I think will help shape the medical aesthetic industry in the coming year and, for the past few years, I’ve told them that a rise in regulatory enforcement could play a major role in the industry’s evolution. I sense that enforcement efforts are increasing throughout the nation, so if your medical spa or medical aesthetic facility is not thoroughly compliant, you should do whatever you can to correct that as soon as possible. (AmSpa members have access to their state’s summary of laws governing aesthetics, and a complimentary introductory compliance call with an aesthetic healthcare attorney from the law firm of ByrdAdatto.)

 

In Florida, for example, there have been a number of high-profile regulatory violations—including the one in Surfside in the recent past, as well as more of the “mundane” cases where people get in trouble for offering procedures they are not qualified to perform—than I can remember seeing before. New York has also been cracking down on medical spas that are not compliant. The lens is focusing ever more closely on this industry, which is not surprising, given the explosive growth it has experienced in recent years.

 

Regulatory bodies in states such as Texas, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, and Arizona are actively creating, amending and clarifying legislation in order to better define what is and what is not allowed in a medical setting. This was recently true for the state of Illinois, which amended its nurse practice act to allow nurse practitioners to achieve full practice authority, giving medical spas in that state a better idea of how to utilize their employees. Also, the Georgia Composite Medical Board recently created a state licensure procedure for laser technicians. 

 

As an industry we need to be compliant, we need to self-regulate, and we need to get our own house in order so that we appear credible and legitimate to regulatory agencies, other powers that be, and consumers. The violations that have been seen in Florida, Texas, New York and other states in recent months are the start of a wave of enforcement that I expect will shape the industry in the coming years.

 

Remember, ignorance is not an excuse, and it is up to you to make sure that your medical spa meets your state’s standards.

 

Sign up for AmSpa’s email list to stay on top of changing medical aesthetic regulations, and for tips on how to get the most out of your aesthetic practice.

Tags:  Med Spa Law 

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Legally Compliant Medical Spa Events to Keep the Holidays Happy

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 14, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Many medical spas and medical aesthetic facilities thank their loyal customers and VIPs with events or parties during the holiday season, where people can undergo treatments while enjoying refreshments with friends and employees. However, despite the frivolity, medical spa owners and operators need to take care to observe all the rules and regulations that they would in the normal course of business. In fact, in a party setting, this might prove to be something of a challenge.

Principle among these concerns is patient privacy. In a party setting, it might seem like no big deal for operators and attendees to take pictures and post them on social media; in fact, it’s the sort of behavior that a traditional retail outlet might encourage, since it shows customers having fun in an exciting setting. However, if photos of a party your medical spa is hosting are posted without a patient’s consent, it is a violation of HIPAA and likely other state regulations related to patient privacy, since you are tacitly admitting that these are your patients. Make sure that anyone appearing in photos you want to post from the party has consented to you using his or her likeness in this fashion; this typically can be accomplished with a disclaimer on the invite, although you should check with your healthcare attorney to make sure that this covers you completely.

Also, regardless of where the party takes place—it’s common for patients to host Botox parties, for example—you must observe the same procedures and protocols that you would in the course of your everyday business. In most states, the law requires that a physician must conduct a face-to-face consultation with each patient who seeks to undergo a medical procedure, and regardless of whether you’re administering these treatments at a party or during normal business hours, they are medical in nature and subject to the rules and regulations that govern medical procedures in your state. (AmSpa members can check the legal summary of medical aesthetic laws in their state.) So by the letter of the law, a physician or licensed practitioner (such as a nurse practitioner or physician assistant) must take a history, conduct a physical and administer an examination to each patient.

After a successful consultation, the patient’s treatment can commence, and while that treatment does not necessarily need to be conducted by a physician or licensed professional, you must make sure that proper supervision is provided. Provided the procedure falls within their scopes of practice, non-licensed professionals—such as laser technicians or nurses—may perform the actual treatments in lieu of a physician. However, a licensed professional must be available during the treatment, should the non-licensed professional require his or her assistance.

It is a good idea to make sure that a physician or another licensed professional is always on-site while medical procedures are being performed. Most medical spa treatments have very little risk of complications or negative outcomes, but if one should occur at one of these parties, the presence of a licensed professional will help protect the business against charges of impropriety.

This might seem like a lot of trouble to go to for a party, but the last thing in the world you want is for your state board of health to leave a citation in your stocking. Make sure all your legal bases are covered, and have a happy holiday season!

Tags:  HIPAA  Med Spa Events  Med Spa Law 

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