Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Join
AmSpa Now
Blog Home All Blogs

Top Medical Spa Legal Issues

Posted By Aly Boeckh, Tuesday, August 15, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The medical spa industry exists at the unfortunate confluence of state statutes, regulations, and often, the rules of multiple professional boards. Although it is easy for a savvy veteran of the medical spa industry to unintentionally run afoul of this web of regulation, it is also shockingly common for some medical spas to be noncompliant with even the most basic of rules. Equally shocking is that the reason behind this noncompliance can be traced back to simple maxim: Many, if not most, of the services offered in medical spas constitute the practice of medicine.

All things considered, perhaps it’s not that surprising that this basic tenet gets overlooked, because medical spas go out of their way to create welcoming, relaxed environments in which patients can receive aesthetic or cosmetic treatments and services. This cultivated “retail” feel is intentional and is antithetical to the feel one often experiences when visiting a doctor, which is perhaps why the fact that medical spa services are the practice of medicine can also easily be overlooked or ignored. However, it is important for both the medical spa and the spa’s clients to bear in mind that most medical spa services do constitute the practice of medicine and should be treated accordingly.

KEY PROBLEM AREA NO. 1:

THE INITIAL EXAM

One key area in which medical spas are often noncompliant is the initial examination of a patient seeking treatment at a medical spa. In the American Med Spa Association’s (AmSpa’s) recent 2017 State of the Medical Spa Industry Report, 37% of respondents admitted that they either do not perform a good faith examination prior to a patient’s first treatment at the medical spa or that the examination is not performed by a physician, physician assistant (PA), or nurse practitioner (NP). Good faith examination is a term used in California to mean the performance of an appropriate prior examination and medical indication before pre- scribing, dispensing, or furnishing a dangerous drug, which would include botulinum toxin type A or fillers prescribed for a patient. Although the good faith examination serves a specific purpose, the responses to the AmSpa survey inform a broader area of noncompliance, because physicians, or the mid-level practitioners to whom they can properly delegate the task, often do not perform an initial patient examination or prescribe treatment plans for medical spa patients. And while the semantics might differ, all states have some requirement that a physician must prescribe a course of treatment before medical spa services may be rendered.

In most states, this initial assessment may be delegated to a PA or NP when proper delegation and supervision protocols are followed, but it would be beyond the scope of practice for a registered nurse (RN) or licensed practical nurse (LPN) to engage in this diagnosis phase of the treatment. This becomes a problem for medical spas, because it is common for a RN to see and treat patients in the facility without the patient ever coming into contact with a physician or a mid-level practitioner, such as a PA or NP. This means that even if the RN performs an initial assessment, that nurse would have acted outside the scope of his or her authority and that medical spa just joined the ranks of the 37% of spas that fail to perform a proper initial assessment of the spa’s patients. This makes this medical spa noncompliant with state law or regulation.

This issue is further complicated by the emergence of telemedicine as a viable alternative through which health care can be delivered, as it begs the question of whether an initial assessment that complies with state requirements
can be completed via telemedicine. To make matters worse, telemedicine is a still developing and evolving legal concept, and laws vary widely from state to state. When it comes to performing the initial assessment via telemedicine, states generally fall into three schools of thought: (1) the initial assessment cannot be performed via telemedicine at all; (2) the initial assessment may be performed via telemedicine where the physician, PA, or NP is present through streaming audio and video, and a nurse is physically present with the patient to guide them; or (3) the initial assessment may be performed via telemedicine where the physician, PA, or NP is present through streaming audio and video. Because many states lack a comprehensive statutory or regulatory structure addressing telemedicine, a medical spa wishing to implement 
initial assessments via telemedicine would be safest by seeking legal counsel on compliance requirements of the state.

HOW DOES YOUR MED SPA STACK UP?

 

KEY PROBLEM AREA NO. 2:

 COMMISSIONS

Another area where medical spas commonly fail to comply with regulation is in the payment of commissions to people working in spas for the performance of specific services. In fact, according to AmSpa’s 2017 State of the Medical Spa Industry Report, 31% of respondents pay commissions for the performance of certain medical treatments. Commissions do not, in and of themselves, violate state law. Rather, commissions fall within a veritable minefield of regulations that intersect to make what otherwise would be a benign form of compensation when properly structured into a payment that is at best unprofessional conduct and at worst illegal. Improper commissions are commonly referred to as fee-splitting, which can be true, but such commissions actually run the risk of violating multiple areas of the law, including fee-splitting, kickbacks, the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, or physician self-referral laws.

Fee-splitting is defined as the practice of sharing fees generated from the performance of professional services with other persons as compensation for referring a patient. Kickbacks are somewhat different from fee-splitting as the focus is not on the source of the income (professional services), but rather whether the compensation, regardless of source, was used to generate referrals.

Kickbacks are generally defined as any sort of compensation, money or otherwise, that is directly or indirectly given or received to induce or reward patient referrals. Physician self-referral prohibitions go hand-in-hand with kickbacks, because they prohibit a physician from paying for referrals to or from another medical practice in which a physician has an ownership interest. Self-referral prohibitions often can be avoided by simply disclosing to a patient the physician’s interest in the practices, and the fact that a fee is being paid for the referral in the form prescribed by a particular state.

Finally, the corporate practice of medicine doctrine prohibits certain business entities or unlicensed individuals from practicing medicine or employing a physician to provide medical services. This means that a commission that (1) is a portion of a professional fee or (2) is paid as compensation for giving or receiving referrals or (3) is paid between entities in which the same physician has an ownership interest or (4) is paid to persons ineligible to have ownership in a medical spa all potentially violate state law or regulation, depending on the particular prohibitions that a state has codified.

Naturally, this raises the question of when can commissions be paid for the performance of medical services. The simplest answer is to avoid commissions to navigate the regulatory mine- field. The best practices of medical spas are to pay a bonus for specified performance metrics or pay a discretionary bonus.

NAVIGATE CAREFULLY

The payment of commissions and the performance of proper initial assessments of medical spa patients are just two examples of noncompliance. Because medical spas exist at the intersection of state law, regulations, and professional board rules, it is easy for a well-intentioned medical spa to be noncompliant. With that in mind, always remember that most treatments at medical spas are considered to be the practice of medicine and everything from the assessment of the patient to the delivery of treatments should be navigated carefully. Also, if a medical spa is going to use incentives as part of a compensation package for its employees, do not pay commissions. Finally, if you ever have any questions or concerns regarding your spa’s compliance with laws, regulations, and professional board rules, please seek legal counsel. (Author’s note: The American Med Spa Association (AmSpa) works with ByrdAdatto, a national law firm that focuses on medical aesthetic legalities and, as a member, along with a number of other great benefits, you receive a free initial consultation. To learn more, click here.) 

This article was originally published in Modern Aesthetics May/June 2017 Supplement issue.

MICHAEL S. BYRD

As the son of a doctor and entrepreneur, Michael S. Byrd , Partner at ByrdAdatto Law Firm, has a personal connection to both business and medicine. He routinely lectures at continuing medical education seminars on the various business and legal issues that medical professionals face. Outside of healthcare, he has handled sensitive and complicated business matters for entrepreneurs, business owners, attorneys, CPAs, high net worth individuals, and public figures. He is also active on the Board of Directors of the LEAP Foundation, an organization that provides pro bono medical services to those in need.

BRADFORD E. ADATTO

Bradford E. Adatto, Partner at ByrdAdatto Law Firm, decided to become a lawyer during sixth-grade Career Day, when he promised to represent his best
friend, a future doctor. Adatto’s background is in regulatory, transactional, and securities law. Having worked in healthcare law his entire career, he has an in-depth knowledge of the “do’s and don’ts” of this heavily regulated industry. Adatto is actively involved in various community and philanthropic associations, and serves as a Board Member of Carry the Load, a charitable organization founded to help veterans and their beneficiaries.

Tags:  AmSpa's 2017 Med Spa Statistical Survey  Med Spa Law 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Off-Label Botox Treatments to Expand Your Med Spa Menu

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, July 31, 2018
Although we all know Botox is primarily used for smoothing wrinkles, today, more and more physicians are expanding their menus by providing off-label uses for Botox that actually have nothing to do with age prevention. According to Time magazine, "More than half of Botox's revenue comes from its therapeutic uses for conditions as varied as chronic migraines and back pain to excessive sweating and twitching eyelids." If done right, offering these treatments could be a real differentiator for your medical spa. Following are just a few treatments that you can add to expand your menu:

1. Chronic Migraines
In 1992, a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon named Dr. William Binder observed a correlation between the use of Botox and the alleviation of pain in patients with headache symptoms. Although this study reported patients having few headaches, some doctors still question if the drug is truly effective or simply has a placebo effect. Nonetheless, if you take a look at the RealSelf approval rating, nearly 90% of patients are happy with the results.

2. Excessive Underarm Sweating
Botox was approved in 2004 to treat the condition called severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis. According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society, "Research demonstrates that treating excessive sweating of the armpits, hands, feet, head and face (craniofacial), and other relatively small body areas (like under the breasts) with onabotulinumtoxinA is safe and effective." It has been shown to result in an 82-87% decrease in sweating, and 86% of Real Self users say that it is worth it.

3. Painful Sex
You can use Botox to treat muscle spasms in the pelvic floor for patients that suffer painful intercourse. The Botox injections help ease pain by making the muscles stop contracting. According to doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, "Some people need injections every six to nine months. Others may only need them every 12 to 24 months." This could be something promoted as a series treatment, to keep clients coming back to your medical spa.

4. Severely Cold Hands
Doctors at the Cold Hand Clinic at the University of Chicago have used Botox to treat patients with very cold hands. Botox is injected into the hand to relax muscles surrounding constricted blood vessels. As the vessels relax and enlarge, more blood can flow through to supply the rest of the hand and the fingertips. The patient could have symptom relief for up to three months.

Now before you add any of these treatments, make sure you understand how the law governs these procedures.

"Generally speaking, physicians are free to use treatments 'off label' so long as they are trained in the off-label use and the treatment is, in the physician’s professional opinion, safe and appropriate. The law allows for off-label use and it is up to the patient, in consultation with his or her physician, to consent to such use. Off-label use of prescription drugs and treatments often provide great effect, but it is important for the physician to inform the patient of--and for the patient to understand--any risks and side effects from such use."

- AmSpa Founder and Director, Alex Thiersch

For more information on medical spa laws and regulations AmSpa members can check their state's Medical Aesthetic Legal Summary or utilize their annual complimentary compliance consultation with the business, healthcare, and aesthetic law firm of ByrdAdatto.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Shady at Best, Dangerous to Patients at Worst | Parallel Importation

Posted By Administration, Friday, January 20, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 23, 2018
As you no doubt are well aware, botulinum toxin treatments—primarily Botox, but also including competitors such as Dysport and Xeomin—are among the most popular procedures in the medical aesthetic industry. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), more than 4.25 million of these treatments were administered in the United States in 2015, for a total expenditure of more than $1.35 billion—the most of any cosmetic procedure, surgical or otherwise. At an average of $317 per treatment, botulinum toxin is affordable for patients, yet still quite profitable for practices. But some want more, and they are beginning to put themselves in danger in the pursuit of larger profits.


One of the ways in which practices are attempting to do this is by buying cheap, usually counterfeit botulinum toxin from other countries, most prominently China. These drugs are not particularly difficult to procure on the Internet if you know where to look and, to some medical aesthetic practices, this represents a way to avoid paying the name-brand premium that legitimate botulinum toxin carries, such as Botox.
While this is shady at best, and dangerous to patients at worst, historically it tended to be fairly easy to get away with. Recently, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stepped up the enforcement of its statutes (fake botulinum toxin is not FDA approved, of course), seizing these drugs at the border and handing down criminal charges against those in the United States who are complicit in their importation, such as the practices that order it.


This enforcement effort has proven to be extremely controversial. “It’s caused quite a bit of angst,” said Michael Byrd, partner for ByrdAdatto, a national business and healthcare law firm based in Dallas. “There’s a lot of unhappiness, even within the governmental agency [FDA]—they refer to themselves in a derogatory manner as the ‘Botox police’ or the ‘Allergan police.’”
FDA agents may feel like their strings are being pulled by a corporation, but this is also unquestionably a matter of maintaining the health of the botulinum toxin-using public.


“Those who are against it say that it’s really just action on behalf of Allergan for Allergan to keep their prices [high]. Those who are for it, as you might suspect, point to patient welfare.”
-Michael Byrd, partner for ByrdAdatto 


Regardless, enforcement has increased, and the charges you can incur as a result of being caught with counterfeit botulinum toxin are very serious. If your owner or operator is found guilty of them, they could theoretically serve jail time in addition to facing heavy fines and the suspension of their medical licenses.


Medical aesthetic practices have also attempted to purchase less expensive botulinum toxin treatments by engaging in a practice called “parallel importation,” whereby a licensed foreign entity purchases legitimate US-produced drugs at a lower rate than US-based distributors (due to local price controls) and then resell them to US-based practices for far less than it would typically cost for the practices to procure them from domestic sources. The US Supreme Court broadly upheld the legality of this practice in the case of Kirtsaeng vs. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (2013), although that particular case related to textbooks, not prescription drugs. As such, there are still some grey areas involving FDA compliance that make this practice risky, despite the fact that every step of the process seems to respect the laws of both the country in which the outlet is located and the United States.


“Enforcement typically stems from an employee, patient, or American industry representative reporting a foreign label on the product. Because the labeling is different on legitimate US products purchased by a foreign entity, practices engaging in parallel importation are also being reported,” explains Byrd. “When I counsel my medical spa or cosmetic practice clients, [I tell them] you have to recognize the risk that comes with any effort to utilize parallel importation. Even if a client is ultimately not found guilty of wrongdoing, an enormous business cost comes with losing inventory in a raid, legal costs to defend the action, and the business disruption that comes with an enforcement action. There is, of course, also risk regarding the legality of the use of parallel importation for prescription drugs. And so, my counsel would be that if you do anything other than buy an FDA-approved and US-distributed product, you have to recognize both of these risks.”


For now, it is probably best not to engage in parallel importation, but it is entirely possible that in the near future, it will be a viable way to purchase FDA-approved products.


 
AmSpa provides a variety of legal and regulatory resources for medical aesthetic practices and medical spas to help you stay legal and compliant. Learn more about our member benefits here


This article originally appeared in the December issue of Modern Aesthetics.

Tags:  Business and Financials  Med Spa Law  Med Spa Ownership 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 17 of 17
 |<   <<   <  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17
Contact Us

224 N Desplaines, Ste. 600S
 Chicago, IL 60661

Phone: 312-981-0993

Fax: 888-827-8860

Mission

AmSpa provides legal, compliance, and business resources for medical spas and medical aesthetic practices.

Follow Us: