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3 Tips for Opening a Medical Spa

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 18, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

There’s more to how to open a medical spa than just being an excellent medical aesthetic practitioner. Of course that is important, but there are basic business and legal compliance steps you also need to take to make sure you are successful in the long term. In 2017, we at the American Medical Spa Association (AmSpa) educated more than 300 medical aesthetic professionals on business and legal best-practices in the industry, approximately 70% of whom were just getting into non-invasive medical aesthetics.

When you’re starting out in the medical aesthetic business, it can seem like you need to learn about an overwhelming number of concepts, from effective retail strategy to regulatory compliance. Attending an AmSpa Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camp can be extremely advantageous, because you can obtain a great deal of information in a short period of time. Here are previews of three very general things you need to do when you open a medical spa (you can learn more about each one at a Boot Camp near you.)

1. Draft a business plan

Business plans can be a real pain to create, but they are an important exercise. Creating a business plan requires you to think critically about details, such as: 
What your marketing strategy is going to be;
What your market is going to be;
Who your typical customers are going to be—how much do they make, are they male or female, how old are they, etc.;
Where you’re going to be located; 
What your brand is going to look like;
What the customer experience is going to be;
How much money you have;
How much money you’re going to spend;
And so forth. 
When you do this and then build it out for three to five years with a budget in a pro forma format, it gives you a good idea of how much money you’re going to need in order to actually operate your medical spa before you profit. 

2. Work with an accountant or financial planner

When people start businesses, they often don’t know how to read and understand financial reports. Even I came up short in this regard when I started my first business. However, it is crucial that you learn how to do this. You need to know what a profit-and-loss statement is (a P&L), what a balance sheet is and how to make a proper budget, as well as understand what different metrics mean so that you can track your progress, make informed decisions, and plan for the future.

I tend to think that most entrepreneurs are just winging it, and sometimes that’s okay, but often it ends up leading to real disaster. Therefore, it’s vital that you get a grip on this aspect of your practice, generally by consulting with someone who has specialized training in business finance. An accountant or financial planner certainly can help with that.

3. Consult with a local health care corporate attorney

A local health care attorney will help you understand the regulatory issues facing medical spas. I am a lawyer, so you might view this as somewhat self-serving, but the truth of the matter is that medical spas are running afoul of regulatory agencies more and more, as we’ve highlighted in this space in recent weeks, so it is a very real issue. You’ll end up spending far more money fixing problems that you create by doing things incorrectly than you will if you first engage a lawyer who knows what he or she is doing.

As a rule of thumb, you should expect to spend $15,000 to $20,000 in legal and accounting fees during your medical spa’s first year in existence. That will go toward creating the company, ensuring that you’re compliant, creating contracts, creating consent forms, establishing standard operating procedures, and so forth.

You can learn more about these and many other topics at AmSpa’s Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps in 2018. Click here to learn more about how you can join us at a Boot Camp this year.

In addition, if you attend The Medical Spa Show in Las Vegas from February 9-11, 2017, you enter a raffle to win an all-expenses-paid trip to Hawaii for our Next Level Leadership event from June 13 to 15. Click here to learn more about The Medical Spa Show.

Tags:  med spa boot camp  opening a med spa 

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The FDA and Medical Aesthetics: 2017 Regulatory Roundup

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, January 3, 2018

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

In recent months, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has begun to focus in on the medical aesthetic industry with a number of rulings on products and procedures, as well as some enforcement efforts. Here’s a quick rundown of the stories from just the past few months:


On September 15, the FDA issued a guidance document that suggested that in the near future, it will begin regulating the use of in-home microneedling devices to prevent injury to consumers.


In October, the agency raided a number of pharmacies in Florida that helped customers order relatively inexpensive prescription drugs from Canada and overseas. This may represent a reversal of a long-standing “non-enforcement” policy regarding this particular form of parallel importation. 


On November 14, the FDA warned consumers and health care practitioners about serious injuries and disfigurement that can result from the illegal use of injectable silicone or fake dermal fillers.


Also in November, the agency issued a consumer update expressing concern about stem cell treatments that are potentially harmful to patients. In it, the FDA outlines its stance on stem cell treatments and offers advice to those seeking them out.


On December 11, the FDA issued three policy papers designed to clarify its approach to the evolving oversight of digital health tools, including fitness trackers and patient support software. This is an advancement of the agency’s Digital Health Action Plan, which was introduced in the summer.

The FDA has also issued approvals for a number of products used medical esthetic treatments.


Merz North America’s Describe PFD patch was approved for use with all tattoo removal lasers; this patch is positioned over tattoos prior to laser removal, enabling multiple rapid laser passes in each treatment session. 


Aclaris Therapeutics’ Eskata (hydrogen peroxide) topical solution has been approved for the treatment of raised seborrheic keratoses


And perhaps most significantly for the medical esthetic industry, Allergan’s Botox neurotoxin has been approved for the temporary treatment of forehead lines.

Given the FDA’s recent increase in activity that could affect med spas, we feel it is important to hear directly from the agency regarding its enforcement efforts. To that end, we have booked Dr. Sangeeta Chatterjee, branch chief in the division of supply chain integrity, to speak on February 11, 2018, at The Medical Spa Show, which will take place at Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. Dr. Chatterjee’s presentation will cover:


Threats to the U.S. drug supply chain;


Public health risks and potential legal consequences associated with purchasing unapproved prescriptions drugs from unlicensed sources;


Safe purchasing practices to ensure the drugs administered to patients are safe, effective, and FDA-approved; and


How to recognize drugs that may be counterfeit or not approved by FDA.

Registration for the show is currently open; click here to learn about the various registration options for the show, see the full schedule, and find out how to reserve a room in AmSpa’s room block at the Aria. Sign up for AmSpa’s email newsletter to continue to get the latest news on medical aesthetic regulations directly to your inbox

Tags:  fda 

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Medical Spa & Aesthetic Laws and Regulations Matter More Than Ever

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 27, 2017

 

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

 

In November 2017, Surfside, Florida, police arrested Alicia Giser, an employee at Lemel Medical Spa, who was accused of practicing medicine without a license. Working off a tip from the Florida Department of Health, Surfside and Miami-Dade County police conducted a sting operation in which Giser represented herself as a doctor and agreed to administer a Juvederm treatment to an undercover officer. Giser has claimed that she is a doctor in her native Argentina, but Florida officials assert that she is not licensed to practice medicine in the state of Florida.

 

Giser’s case is an example of the kind of thing that’s existed in the medical aesthetic industry for many years, but which regulatory agencies have typically been unable or unwilling to police. That is no longer the case, and it could signal a major change in the status quo for the future.

 

This time of year, it’s fairly common for people to ask me what trends I think will help shape the medical aesthetic industry in the coming year and, for the past few years, I’ve told them that a rise in regulatory enforcement could play a major role in the industry’s evolution. I sense that enforcement efforts are increasing throughout the nation, so if your medical spa or medical aesthetic facility is not thoroughly compliant, you should do whatever you can to correct that as soon as possible. (AmSpa members have access to their state’s summary of laws governing aesthetics, and a complimentary introductory compliance call with an aesthetic healthcare attorney from the law firm of ByrdAdatto.)

 

In Florida, for example, there have been a number of high-profile regulatory violations—including the one in Surfside in the recent past, as well as more of the “mundane” cases where people get in trouble for offering procedures they are not qualified to perform—than I can remember seeing before. New York has also been cracking down on medical spas that are not compliant. The lens is focusing ever more closely on this industry, which is not surprising, given the explosive growth it has experienced in recent years.

 

Regulatory bodies in states such as Texas, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, and Arizona are actively creating, amending and clarifying legislation in order to better define what is and what is not allowed in a medical setting. This was recently true for the state of Illinois, which amended its nurse practice act to allow nurse practitioners to achieve full practice authority, giving medical spas in that state a better idea of how to utilize their employees. Also, the Georgia Composite Medical Board recently created a state licensure procedure for laser technicians. 

 

As an industry we need to be compliant, we need to self-regulate, and we need to get our own house in order so that we appear credible and legitimate to regulatory agencies, other powers that be, and consumers. The violations that have been seen in Florida, Texas, New York and other states in recent months are the start of a wave of enforcement that I expect will shape the industry in the coming years.

 

Remember, ignorance is not an excuse, and it is up to you to make sure that your medical spa meets your state’s standards.

 

Sign up for AmSpa’s email list to stay on top of changing medical aesthetic regulations, and for tips on how to get the most out of your aesthetic practice.

Tags:  med spa law 

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Legally Compliant Medical Spa Events to Keep the Holidays Happy

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 14, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Many medical spas and medical aesthetic facilities thank their loyal customers and VIPs with events or parties during the holiday season, where people can undergo treatments while enjoying refreshments with friends and employees. However, despite the frivolity, medical spa owners and operators need to take care to observe all the rules and regulations that they would in the normal course of business. In fact, in a party setting, this might prove to be something of a challenge.

Principle among these concerns is patient privacy. In a party setting, it might seem like no big deal for operators and attendees to take pictures and post them on social media; in fact, it’s the sort of behavior that a traditional retail outlet might encourage, since it shows customers having fun in an exciting setting. However, if photos of a party your medical spa is hosting are posted without a patient’s consent, it is a violation of HIPAA and likely other state regulations related to patient privacy, since you are tacitly admitting that these are your patients. Make sure that anyone appearing in photos you want to post from the party has consented to you using his or her likeness in this fashion; this typically can be accomplished with a disclaimer on the invite, although you should check with your healthcare attorney to make sure that this covers you completely.

Also, regardless of where the party takes place—it’s common for patients to host Botox parties, for example—you must observe the same procedures and protocols that you would in the course of your everyday business. In most states, the law requires that a physician must conduct a face-to-face consultation with each patient who seeks to undergo a medical procedure, and regardless of whether you’re administering these treatments at a party or during normal business hours, they are medical in nature and subject to the rules and regulations that govern medical procedures in your state. (AmSpa members can check the legal summary of medical aesthetic laws in their state.) So by the letter of the law, a physician or licensed practitioner (such as a nurse practitioner or physician assistant) must take a history, conduct a physical and administer an examination to each patient.

After a successful consultation, the patient’s treatment can commence, and while that treatment does not necessarily need to be conducted by a physician or licensed professional, you must make sure that proper supervision is provided. Provided the procedure falls within their scopes of practice, non-licensed professionals—such as laser technicians or nurses—may perform the actual treatments in lieu of a physician. However, a licensed professional must be available during the treatment, should the non-licensed professional require his or her assistance.

It is a good idea to make sure that a physician or another licensed professional is always on-site while medical procedures are being performed. Most medical spa treatments have very little risk of complications or negative outcomes, but if one should occur at one of these parties, the presence of a licensed professional will help protect the business against charges of impropriety.

This might seem like a lot of trouble to go to for a party, but the last thing in the world you want is for your state board of health to leave a citation in your stocking. Make sure all your legal bases are covered, and have a happy holiday season!

Tags:  HIPAA  Med Spa Law 

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Make Your Plans to Attend AmSpa’s Medical Spa Show in Las Vegas

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 12, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

The American Med Spa Association (AmSpa) is working hard to put the finishing touches on planning for The Medical Spa Show, the premier trade show for non-invasive medical aesthetics, which will take place February 9 - 11, 2018, at the Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. We recently mailed the program to AmSpa members, and you may already have received it; if not, please contact us—we will be happy to mail you one, or you can check out the PDF here. AmSpa has developed a very strong agenda that offers real insight into cutting-edge treatments, including microblading, new techniques in fillers and Botox, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), stem cells, and more.

 

It is very important to note that The Medical Spa Show’s room block at the Aria is very close to being full, so if you are planning to attend and wish to take advantage of the special rate we are offering in conjunction with the resort, you need to register for the conference and reserve your room very soon. The room block will sell out, and we want to make sure everybody who wants to stay at the Aria gets the chance. Along with that, Chinese New Year is a huge occasion in Vegas and all resorts in the city regularly fill up during the time of The Medical Spa Show, so it is urgent that you make your reservations now. Click here to register for the conference; upon registration, you will receive information about the room block.

 

Also, the expo hall is completely sold out. It has sold much quicker than we ever could have anticipated. The Medical Spa Show is welcoming an incredible array of exhibitors from all different verticals in the industry, from injectables to lasers to digital marketing, and everything in between. Learn about all the latest trends and opportunities available to the medical aesthetics industry on our show floor. Check out the list of exhibitors here

 

Thank you to everybody who already has registered to attend. The entire AmSpa team is very excited to present the best show in the country for medical spas. We can’t wait to see everybody there!

Tags:  The Medical Spa Show 2018 

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‘Tis the Season: Gift cards for Medical Spas

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 5, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Medical spas typically see an uptick in sales of gift cards during the holiday season. And although selling or giving away gift cards may seem like simple transactions, the fact that medical spas are medical institutions does complicate matters a bit from a legal standpoint. Following are a few things about distributing gift cards that medical spa owners and operators should keep in mind.

First and most importantly, there are federal regulations that govern gift cards. The Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 includes provisions that protect consumers from fraudulent and predatory practices by those who sell gift cards. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) consumer information website:

 "Money on a gift card cannot expire for at least five years from the date the card was purchased, or from the last date any additional money was loaded onto the card. If the expiration date listed on the card is earlier than these dates, the money can be transferred to a replacement card at no cost."
 "Inactivity fees can be charged only after a card hasn't been used for at least one year, and you can be charged only once per month. But you may be charged a fee to buy the card or to replace a lost or stolen card."
 "The expiration date of a card must be clearly disclosed on the card, and fees must be clearly disclosed on the card or its packaging."

If your gift cards do not meet these standards, you certainly should do what you can to amend them. The FTC responds to consumer complaints regarding gift cards from retailers, and you don’t want to run afoul of it.

Also, gift cards for medical spas fall into a bit of a strange grey area due to the corporate practice of medicine, a doctrine observed by many states that dictates that only a physician or physician-owned corporation can receive payment for medical services. Since many of the treatments offered at medical spas are medical in nature, the ownership of these practices is governed by this doctrine. To see if your state follows the corporate practice of medicine check your state’s medical aesthetic legal summary.

As it relates to gift cards, this means that the payment for the gift cards must be made in full to a physician or physician-owned corporation; otherwise, the practice has engaged in fee-splitting, which is illegal in most states. 

Also, you may wish to reward employees or customers who bring in business with gift cards, but doing so in a medical setting, such as a medical spa, can represent a violation of state and federal anti-kickback laws, which prohibit practices from paying for referrals. Because gift cards have a cash value attached to them, they can be viewed as representing a kickback and, therefore, expose the practice to legal action.

A medical spa owner or operator must be mindful when he or she is giving out gift cards. If the person who receives the card is not paying for it, there must be clear understanding that is not being given for any business-related purpose. If you give gift cards only as tokens of your appreciation, you should be fine.

The holiday season is meant to be a joyous time; keep it that way by understanding and observing the rules and regulations related to gift card distribution.

Tags:  gift cards  med spa law 

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AmSpa Offers Microblading Training at The Medical Spa Show

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 22, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

Microblading is here to stay. A semi-permanent beautification technique that is typically used to improve the perceived thickness of patients’ eyebrows, microblading is a treatment in which technicians create superficial cuts near the surface of the skin and fill them with pigment, creating the illusion of fuller hair. It is an exciting treatment that is becoming quite popular—in fact, according to the 2017 State of the Medical Spa Industry Report conducted by AmSpa, microblading is the fastest-growing new treatment in the industry, with revenue produced by it increasing approximately 40% from year to year. 

However, it is also worth noting that AmSpa’s study found that only around 25% of medical spas offer microblading. That number seems to be rising, but the market for this service is also growing, and enterprising practices stand to make a great deal of money with it, since it is absurdly inexpensive to the practice—all it requires is a disposable device that costs around $5. What’s more, in many states a practice typically does not need a doctor or a medically licensed practitioner to perform these treatments, thus keeping their practical costs low. However, medical spas can charge upwards of $500 for microblading services, so practices can reap very high profit margins when it is administered. Patients like it because it is simple and semi-permanent, making it a much more palatable solution than tattooing, which has been used in the past for the same purpose; microblading also tends to look a bit more natural.

I’ve been told by medical aesthetic professionals that eyebrows are the new lips, so microblading is something that medical spa owners who want to advance their practices should definitely consider exploring.

Educate yourself


Because microblading is so potentially lucrative, AmSpa is offering a one-day microblading training course at The Medical Spa Show in Las Vegas, which takes place on February 9, 2018. It is presented by Maegen Kennedy from Fleek Brows Microblading in Orlando, FL, who has been training people to perform this technique for several years. She is a board-certified physician assistant and licensed tattoo artist whose experience in the field can help newcomers understand the ins and outs of the microblading process. Visit themedicalspashow.com or americanmedspa.org to learn more about this opportunity. 

The micro print


If you are considering joining AmSpa and Maegen for this course, you should probably be aware ahead of time that because the microblading process is so similar to that of tattooing, most states that have issued rulings on the matter of who can legally perform these treatments have declared that a tattooing or body art license is required to perform it. 


If your practice is located in one of these states, you and your employees would need to obtain these licenses (if you don’t already have them) in order to perform microblading treatments in a medical spa. This might sound like a bit of a hassle, but earning a tattooing license is often surprisingly simple. Consult a local health care attorney to learn how you and your employees can get tattooing licenses in your state or city. (Author’s note: The American Med Spa Association (AmSpa) works with a national law firm that focuses on medical aesthetic legalities and, as a member, along with a number of other great benefits, you receive a discount off of your initial consultation. To learn more, log on to www.americanmedspa.org.)

If you need to know anything else about this topic, you can learn more about microblading at AmSpa’s consumer treatment website

Microblading training is highly sought after, and this is a great chance to learn about a type of treatment that could make a big difference for a practice’s bottom line. Join AmSpa and Maegen Kennedy in Las Vegas to learn how your medical spa can hit the jackpot with microblading.

Tags:  Medical Spa Show  Microblading 

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Inc.com Article Outlines Business Concepts Vital to Medical Spa Success

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 14, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

In this space, I often discuss the legal peculiarities of running medical aesthetic practices from a viewpoint that generally deals with medical issues. However, while it is critical that medical spa owners and operators understand what’s expected from them in terms of rules and regulations, they must be equally adept at managing the business side of the aesthetics equation.

To that end, I highly recommend reading “6 Business and Financial Terms Every New Entrepreneur Needs to Know” by Jeff Haden on Inc.com. In general, Inc.com is an extremely useful resource for people who wish to develop a better understanding of the ways business works. It has given me some really valuable, practical tidbits over the years, and I would highly encourage anyone who is serious about developing their business savvy to follow Inc.’s Facebook page or regularly visit its website.

In this article, Haden gives basic but very informative explanations of these six metrics:

  • Customer acquisition cost,
  • Customer lifetime value,
  • Customer retention rate,
  • Repeat purchase rate,
  • Redemption rate, and
  • Revenue percentages.

This piece is extremely applicable to medical spas. Practice owners who take the time to learn the specific metrics that are referenced in this article tend to be the ones who are the most successful—the ones whose practices bring in millions of dollars in revenue every year.

You can spot a dedicated business owner from the types of metrics that they look at, and the ones mentioned in Haden’s piece are the ones that AmSpa’s industry experts discuss in our Medical Spa & Aesthetic Boot Camps. They are all vital when it comes to managing your medical spa, because a medical spa is much more akin to a retail store than it is to a doctor’s office, even though you have to follow the same rules and regulations concerning the administration of medical procedures that a doctor’s office would.

If a medical spa owner truly wants to be successful, he or she needs to realistically understand the dual nature of the business. If you are a nurse or a doctor, you need expand your horizons to better understand the ins and outs of the retail business. Sometimes, that means taking a 30,000-foot view of what your data shows you. Any initiative that you’re taking must be measured, tracked, and eventually evaluated.

The decisions you make should be based on the data you’ve compiled. The metrics mentioned in “6 Business and Financial Terms Every New Entrepreneur Needs to Know” are vital to helping you develop a more thorough understanding of the way your business functions. I think it explains these concepts very well.

At the end of the day, a medical aesthetic practice must make money. This might seem to go without saying, but when you’re in the process of starting up a medical spa, several other aspects of the business might seem to take precedent, especially if you’re coming to the medical aesthetic business from a medical background. And yes, it’s vitally important to set up a compliant practice and make sure that you’re following all applicable state and local regulations to the letter, but if you’re not doing everything you can to understand and utilize business concepts such as these, you’re not giving your medical spa a fair chance to succeed.

Tags:  business and financial terms 

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FDA Guidance Offers Clarity on Microneedling Issues

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 7, 2017

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

The question of who can perform microneedling has been a hot-button one in spas and medical spas in recent years. On September 15, 2017, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a draft guidance to employees and industry professionals concerning its position on controversies concerning microneedling devices. The document, titled “Regulatory Considerations for Microneedling Devices,” clarifies the rules and offers definitions for a variety of microneedling products. It can be read and downloaded here.

Microneedling—also known as collagen induction therapy—is a skin treatment in which tiny needles are introduced to the skin, penetrating it in order to stimulate the production of collagen and other growth factors. It is relatively inexpensive, usually produces visible results without complications, and is easy to perform, so it has appeal both to medical aesthetic professionals and patients. (See AmSpa’s Treatment Directory for more information on microneedling.)

However, while this treatment is simple, the legal issues surrounding it are not, so it is important to understand why microneedling is such a controversial topic and why this document from the FDA is an important step toward clarity.

The controversy


Treatments that break the outer layer of a patient’s skin typically are considered to be medical in nature. This might seem to intrinsically make microneedling a medical procedure but, in fact, it is very difficult to judge whether or not the skin is being broken when you are dealing with tiny needles that can be as small as fractions of a millimeter long. Skin layer depth varies from patient to patient and depends on the part of the body being treated, as well as the amount of pressure being applied. 

Hypothetically, if microneedling is not a medical procedure, it could be performed by an aesthetician without an exam. However, if it is medical, a patient history must be taken, a licensed medical professional must administer an exam prior to treatment, and proper supervision and/or delegation procedures must be observed during the treatment. Put simply, if microneedling is treated as a medical procedure, it is far less profitable for the medical spa and far less convenient for the patient.

Getting to the point


This draft guidance is a big deal for the medical aesthetic industry. It offers some clarity regarding whether or not the manufacturers of certain microneedling devices need to be compliant with FDA standards, which gives some insight into the current attitudes of the agency and its partners regarding the nature of these treatments.

“Depending on the applicable state laws for scope of practice, delegation and supervision, this could result in medical spas having to reorganize their staffing for the performance of microneedling using newly classified devices,” says Jay D. Reyero, JD, partner at ByrdAdatto. “It could also result in transforming more traditional spas that feature microneedling into what we think of as medical spas.”

We advise everyone who is using microneedling devices at their medical spas to proceed with some caution, because there are FDA issues that are being worked through with regard to compliance. 

“We could see a clear distinction of what constitutes the practice of medicine for purposes of microneedling develop, giving medical spas more clarity on the issue,” Reyero says. “We could envision state licensing boards adopting a position to rely on the FDA’s determination and base a determination of the practice of medicine simply on the type of microneedling product used rather than the particular effects on the human skin or the lengths of needles.”

We anticipate that in the next month or two, the FDA will provide some clarification regarding these issues, but for now, it likely is best to proceed as if these treatments are explicitly medical in nature.

For other medical aesthetic legal questions be sure to seek legal advice from an attorney familiar with aesthetic laws in your state. AmSpaBasic members have access to a 60-question legal summary of regulations in their state, while AmSpaPlus members have access to these answers plus 25 additional questions. Become a member today to get answers to your aesthetic legal questions.

 

 

Tags:  med spa law  microneedling 

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Illinois Nurse Practice Act Update

Posted By Administration, Friday, November 3, 2017

 

By Alex R. Thiersch, JD, Founder/Director of the American Med Spa Association (AmSpa)

UPDATE: Gov. Rauner signed the revised Illinois Nurse Practice Act on Sept. 20. As stated in this post, it will take effect on Jan. 1, 2018. AmSpa will be conducting a webinar discussing the implications of this development on November 15, 2017 from 11:30am - 12:30 pm CST. If you own or operate a medical spa in Illinois, or if you live elsewhere and want to know how similar legislation might affect the industry in your state, register for the webinar today.

Tags:  Illinois Nurse Practice Act  Med Spa Law 

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